9 Best SSD Docking Station | December 2016

9 Best SSD Docking Station
Best Mid-Range
★★★★
Best High-End
★★★★★
Best Inexpensive
★★★★★
If you work with memory hungry applications and need quick and easy access to additional hard drive space, one of these SSD docking stations can give you all the flexibility and capability you are looking for. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best ssd docking station on Amazon.
9
The Satechi ST-U3ADS boasts an attractive metallic brushed aluminum finish to complement your high tech devices, and is compatible with MAC OSX, Windows 7, 8, Vista and XP.
  • 3 hub and card reader inputs
  • solid high quality construction
  • plug takes up 2 spaces on power strip
Brand Satechi
Model ST-U3ADS
Weight 1.2 pounds
Rating 3.7 / 5.0
8
Save time and money using the Sabrent DS-UBLK which enables you to access and transfer data between your computer and two hard drives simultaneously.
  • hard drive support up to 4tb
  • incredible value at the price
  • confusing instructional guide
Brand Sabrent
Model DS-UBLK
Weight 1.7 pounds
Rating 3.9 / 5.0
7
The Unitek Y-3025M conveniently allows two hard drives to read & write at the same time, and quickly transfers files, photos, videos and games with UASP acceleration.
  • backward compatible with usb 2.0/1.1
  • one button data transfer system
  • compact design saves desk space
Brand Unitek
Model Y-3025
Weight 1.9 pounds
Rating 3.7 / 5.0
6
The efficient Orico 6619S3 is designed specifically to work with desktop computers, and can easily install and unmount within seconds to access your files in a hurry.
  • hot swapping supported
  • includes lifetime tech support
  • weighted base to prevent tipping over
Brand ORICO
Model pending
Weight 0.3 ounces
Rating 4.4 / 5.0
5
The highly efficient Inatek FD2002 is a stable and reliable DC power source and dock that is equipped with an easy to use cloning technology which works without a PC.
  • integrated short circuit protection
  • 70% faster than conventional usb 3.0
  • rubber feet to protect your work surface
Brand Inateck
Model FD2002
Weight 1.3 pounds
Rating 4.3 / 5.0
4
The Plugable USB3-SATA-UASP1 features a unique horizontal design that allows better heat dissipation, and automatically sleeps after 10 minutes of idling to conserve power.
  • standard usb mass storage class support
  • supports any drive capacity
  • fits compactly in tight spaces
Brand Plugable
Model USB3-SATA-UASP1
Weight 1.4 pounds
Rating 4.3 / 5.0
3
The premium Anker AK-68UPSHDDS-BU transfers your data to and from your 2.5" and 3.5" hard and solid state drives at lightning speeds up to 5 Gbps.
  • led shows data status
  • snaps firmly into place
  • includes a usb 3.0 cable
Brand Anker
Model AK-68UPSHDDS-BU
Weight 2 pounds
Rating 4.7 / 5.0
2
The iDsonix SuperSpeed has a simple plug and play design that is useful when you need fast access to uninstalled or unarchived drives at a cost effective price.
  • led power indicator light
  • also supports 2.5/3.5" sata drives
  • ac adapter and data cable included
Brand iDsonix®
Model iDD-U3102-BK
Weight 1.7 pounds
Rating 4.6 / 5.0
1
The Sabrent DS-RICA is the ultimate multitasking accessory, allowing connection of up to three monitors with simultaneous HDMI and DVI displays.
  • gigabit ethernet port for hard wiring
  • data transfer rates of up to 5 gbps
  • includes a microphone jack
Brand Sabrent
Model DS-RICA
Weight 2.3 pounds
Rating 4.6 / 5.0

Buyer's Guide

The Evolution Of Solid-State Drives

The majority of us think of solid-state drives as a new technology, but the technology actually first started to appear in the 1950s with the development of two technologies; card capacitor read-only store and magnetic core memory. These memory units were created during the vacuum-tube computer era, but as lower cost drum storage units were developed, production and usage of these rudimentary memory units ceased.

In the 1970s, SSDs were integrated into semiconductor memory devices for some IBM, Amdahl and Cray supercomputers, but their restrictively high price point meant they weren't often used. One example is Dataram's 1976 Bulk Core solid-state disk, which offered 2MB of storage space and sold for $9,700. With inflation factored in, that equates to over $30,000 today.

In 1978, a 16KB RAM solid-state drive was introduced by Texas Memory Systems. Just one year later, StorageTek released their own RAM SSD. As the 1980s rolled around, Intel created the 1M bit bubble memory, which was intended to be the new go-to non volatile solid state memory. Unfortunately their invention proved not to be cost effective or scalable and it quickly dropped out of the market.

In 1984, Tallgrass Technologies created the first hybrid drive. It had a a 40MB magnetic tape memory drive, with a 20MB SSD that could be used instead of the standard hard drive. This gave users the ability to store commonly accessed files and programs on the SSD so they could access them faster.

In 1995, flash-based solid-state drives were introduced. Unlike all previous SSDs, they did not require battery power to maintain data. This was a vital step in allowing SSDs to replace HDDs as a computer's main memory storage system. Since then, a number of innovations in SSD technology have allowed them to become faster, cheaper, and more durable, making them the best option when it comes to computer memory storage today.

Benefits Of A Solid-State Drive

Solid-state drives outperform traditional hard disk drives in a number of key areas. The first thing most users will notice when using a computer with an SSD is how much faster they are. The average HDD takes from 5,000 to 10,000 microseconds to access data, whereas the typical SSD only takes from 35 to 100 microseconds. That makes them over 100 times faster. This is due to the mechanical nature of a hard disk drive.

Inside of an HDD, there is a spinning magnetic disk and an actuator arm. When a computer needs to access a particular program or file, the actuator must lift up and move over the correct spot on the disk before it can read the data. This is one of the main issues slowing down hard disk drives. If the computer is just coming out of sleep mode, it must also wait for the disks to come to speed before data can be read. SSDs have no moving parts and can access data nearly instantaneously.

SSDs are ideal for ultrabooks as they are smaller and use less power than HDDs. This makes them more mobile friendly, and ideal for those who travel often or need a computer to last all day without having to be recharged. They are also more durable. Another drawback of the mechanical nature of the HDD is that they are more affected by bumps, drops, and other impacts. Anything that can affect the equilibrium of the spinning disk or cause issues with the movement of the actuator arm can cause problems ranging from drive failure to increased read and write times. SSDs can withstand greater impacts than HDDs, without worry of causing damage. This makes the perfect for users who are constantly taking their computers on the go.

Choosing An SSD Docking Station

When it comes time to expand your local storage space, using an SSD docking station to access your memory is one of the best options. The key is to buy one that has all the features you might need. Many SSD docking stations allow users to access memory from both internal HDDs and SDDs. Even if you don't currently own an extra HDD, there is no reason not to buy a universal docking station. You never know when you may need to access a friend's HDD, or if you may need to expand you local storage space in the future and won't have the cash to outlay on an expensive SSD.

Another feature to look for is one touch disk cloning. This allows you to clone the entire contents of one drive onto another drive, without needing computer support. Not only is this convenient for those times you don't have your computer handy, but it is also faster than running everything through your computer during transfers.

The more adaptability your SSD docking station has, the better. So look for one that has multiple connection ports, including USB, HDMI, and DVI. It is also best to look for one that works with both Macs and PCs. Some may also feature Ethernet ports for internet connectivity. For those who plan on taking their docking station on the go, there are pocket-sized models available, which are lightweight and durable.



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Last updated on December 15, 2016 by multiple members of the ezvid wiki editorial staff

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