10 Fascinating and Entertaining Works of Non-Fiction

If you love to gather interesting facts and discover new things, then you're probably already a fan of non-fiction. This genre includes everything from biographies and memoirs to books about mathematics and science. If you're interested in learning about the world in an entertaining way, check out the ten fascinating books listed here. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

10 Fascinating and Entertaining Works of Non-Fiction

Title Author(s) Subject
1. Grace Tiffanie DeBartolo The life of Jeff Buckley
2. The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets Simon Singh Mathematics
3. Quarterback John Feinstein The role of the quarterback in football
4. Black Dahlia, Red Rose Piu Marie Eatwell The infamous Black Dahlia murder
5. The Evolution of Everything Matt Ridley How new ideas emerge
6. The Wander Society Keri Smith A secret society of wanderers
7. Light Falls Brian Greene The history of Albert Einstein's most famous discovery
8. Fractured Not Broken M. Weidenbenner & Kelly Schaefer One woman's experience being paralyzed from the neck down
9. She Has Her Mother's Laugh Carl Zimmer The science of heredity
10. Adnan's Story Rabia Chaudry The justice system and discrimination

Literary Charities

If you want to spread your love of learning with those in need, then you should consider looking into these non-profit organizations that help kids and teens get access to books and high-quality education.

  1. First Book
  2. Books for Kids
  3. Room to Read
  4. LitWorld
  5. 826 National
  6. KIPP

How Books Can Open Your Mind

In Depth

Whether you're looking to learn something new or just interested in true, and often enticingly strange, stories about the lives of other people, reading non-fiction can be a great way to expand your knowledge on certain subjects. With that in mind, we've compiled a list of ten fascinating and entertaining works of non-fiction about various topics. Take note that this list is done in no particular order.

First up, at #1, we have "Grace" by Tiffanie DeBartolo, with art by Pascal Dizin and Lisa Reist. This graphic biography follows the life and career of Jeff Buckley, an American musician best known for songs such as "Grace" and his cover of Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah." The book covers Buckley's early years all the way up to his unfortunate demise in 1997, when he accidentally drowned while swimming in the Mississippi River.

Next, at #2, is "The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets" by Simon Singh. It provides some insight on the many subtle math-related references found throughout the long-running animated series. Singh attempts to explain the academic concepts carefully embedded in the plot by the show's writers, many of whom have advanced degrees in Mathematics and other sciences. It's a very informative book, and even hardcore fans of the show are sure to learn something new from it.

It provides some insight on the many subtle math-related references found throughout the long-running animated series.

At #3 is "Quarterback" by John Feinstein. This book takes a closer look at the highly coveted quarterback position in football. Sportswriter Feinstein describes what it's like to be among the most esteemed football players in the NFL and the amount of pressure they're subjected to as a result of their talent and fame. More specifically, the author focuses on the daily lives of five starting quarterbacks in the NFL, detailing the highs and lows of their careers and their journeys from college to national stardom.

Next up, at #4, we have "Black Dahlia, Red Rose" by Piu Marie Eatwell. Black Dahlia was the nickname given to Elizabeth Short, an aspiring actress whose body was found brutally mutilated in Los Angeles in 1947. Her murder is one of the most high-profile cold cases in America, and Eatwell digs deep into the piles of evidence in order to try and figure out who really killed Elizabeth and why it was done in such a gruesome manner.

At #5 is "The Evolution of Everything" by Matt Ridley. Ridley attempts to explain how the process of biological evolution can be applied to everything in the world, such as culture and technology. Throughout the book, he argues that change starts from down below and that concepts such as the economy, morality, and even religion are developed from the bottom-up as opposed to being shaped from the top-down by a figure of authority.

Throughout the book, he argues that change starts from down below and that concepts such as the economy, morality, and even religion are developed from the bottom-up as opposed to being shaped from the top-down by a figure of authority.

Next, at #6, is "The Wander Society" by Keri Smith. When Smith found a series of cryptic handwritten notes in an old copy of Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass," she decided to investigate their origins. According to her research, the eponymous secret society is a group of anonymous wanderers who aimlessly explore the world in order to stimulate their imaginations or just escape the hustle and bustle of city life, and the author encourages readers to try it out themselves.

At #7 is "Light Falls" by Brian Greene. This audiobook chronicles Albert Einstein's journey towards discovering his world-renowned theory of relativity. Featuring award-winning actor Paul Rudd as the voice of Einstein, it's a dramatized retelling of the famous physicist's life before and after his groundbreaking discovery. Most of the scientific concepts presented have been somewhat simplified, making it very accessible to anyone with a passing interest in physics.

Next up, at #8, we have "Fractured Not Broken" by M. Weidenbenner and Kelly Schaefer. This heartbreaking yet inspirational memoir is about the life of Kelly Craig, a victim of a tragic drunk driving accident that left her paralyzed from the neck down. It describes the many difficulties she and her family faced after the incident, which also left her brother with a traumatic brain injury, and it shows how faith can help people recover from life-changing disasters.

This heartbreaking yet inspirational memoir is about the life of Kelly Craig, a victim of a tragic drunk driving accident that left her paralyzed from the neck down.

At #9 is "She Has Her Mother's Laugh" by Carl Zimmer. By comparing historical information with current scientific developments, Zimmer attempts to explain the concept of heredity and how our understanding of genetics has drastically changed over the years. The author dives deep into the topic of heredity, exploring how our genetic inheritance can affect our daily lives and the ethical and moral concerns that come with some of the technologies and methods used to study it.

Finally, at #10, we have "Adnan's Story" by Rabia Chaudry. In February 2000, Adnan Syed was convicted to life in prison for the murder of his ex-girlfriend, Hae Min Lee. The author presents new evidence that aims to prove his innocence, and goes into detail about her claim that Syed's incarceration was the result of unfair cultural bias and an ineffective defense attorney. The book also covers Adnan's experiences in prison, and his thoughts on how his case has been handled throughout the years.