10 Unconventional Self-Help Books For Those Seeking Guidance

Whether you want to move your life in an entirely new direction or are just looking for a little inspiration, reading self-help books can give you the advice you need to reach your goals. The ten works listed here think outside the box and provide readers with fresh perspectives on a variety of issues. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Self-Help Books: Our 10 Picks

Title Author(s)
1. The Urban Monk Pedram Shojai
2. You Can Fix Your Family Charles Fishman
3. The Answer Allan Pease & Barbara Pease
4. Live Your Truth Kamal Ravikant
5. Raise Your Hand If You Have Issues Michael Baisden
6. Chill Deborah Reber
7. Resistance is Feudal Debbianne DeRose
8. How to Save Your Own Life Michael Gates Gill
9. How to Instantly Connect with Anyone Leil Lowndes
10. Advice Not Given Mark Epstein

Ideas for Self-Improvement

Why You Should Read Self-Help Books

In Depth

From mastering communication with people, to setting aside ego, to reducing stress, there are many ways people can approach self-improvement. Each book listed here offers a different perspective, and targets a specific area of interest. Presented in no particular order, here are ten unique and innovative books for anyone in need of a little guidance.

Beginning the list at #1 is "The Urban Monk" by Pedram Shojai. As amazing as technological advances are, it feels like the more people rely on them, the more discontent they become. While modern life may seem antithetical to Zen, Shojai describes how we can attain calmness as the world buzzes around us. With daily guides to help with everything from nutrition to addiction, this "New York Times" bestseller is aimed at helping you achieve peace, wherever you are.

At #2 is "You Can Fix Your Family" by Charles Fishman. Being a good member of a household isn't always easy. No matter how much you love your parents, kids, siblings, or spouse, a few problems are likely to arise. As a family therapist, Fishman has a unique perspective on how homes can come together to create harmony, happiness, and a positive dynamic.

No matter how much you love your parents, kids, siblings, or spouse, a few problems are likely to arise.

#3 on the list is "The Answer," by Allan and Barbara Pease. When disaster hit their family, the authors learned how to alter their mentality, and turn obstacles into opportunities. After studying the brain, they came to the conclusion that it's possible to reprogram our thinking. They explain that by asking the right questions, we are all capable of achieving the things we want in life.

Coming in at #4 is "Live Your Truth" by Kamal Ravikant. Happiness and fulfillment aren't accidents. It takes some work to achieve them. Ravikant believes that in order to be at our greatest, we must learn to look inside ourselves. He recounts his own journey of self-exploration, and says that by accepting our true selves, we can all begin to live our best lives.

#5 is "Raise Your Hand If You Have Issues" by Michael Baisden. It's usually a smart idea to listen when people offer advice. But it's also vital to think for yourself, rather than just following the path others tell you to take. A former Air Force Sergeant and college dropout, Baisden put faith in his dream, and found success as a talk radio and television host. He shares stories and tips for ignoring what is expected of you, and learning how to live the unique life that you want.

A former Air Force Sergeant and college dropout, Baisden put faith in his dream, and found success as a talk radio and television host.

#6 on the list is "Chill" by Deborah Reber. It's easy to become overwhelmed and overworked in the modern world. Thanks to social media and heavy work schedules, many people have limited free time, and excess anxiety. Reber discusses the physical and mental ramifications of being stressed out, and provides various tips and daily techniques for limiting it.

At #7 is "Resistance is Feudal" by Debbianne DeRose. Non-resistance is the idea of letting go of combative and negative thoughts. The author believes that most people's lives are full of resistance, even if they think otherwise. With tips, techniques, and practical examples, DeRose describes how readers can remove unfavorable mindsets and transform their daily lives.

Coming in at #8 is "How to Save Your Own Life" by Michael Gates Gill. The author once had good health, a happy marriage, and a high-paying, powerful job. Next thing he knew, he was divorced, had a brain tumor, and was working at Starbucks. He didn't let any of that keep him from happiness. With empowering words and poignant stories, Gill emphasizes the importance of rescuing ourselves, and finding joy in the little things.

He didn't let any of that keep him from happiness.

At #9 is "How to Instantly Connect with Anyone" by Leil Lowndes. In the sequel to her popular book "How to Talk to Anyone," Lowndes shares ninety-six tricks for mastering communication with all kinds of people. From ideas on how to actually enjoy parties, to advice for making a strong first impression, she provides readers with the necessary tools to excel in any social situation.

Finishing the list at #10 is "Advice Not Given" by Mark Epstein. Everyone has an ego, which can often be detrimental. The relentless chase of both attention and authority keeps people from accomplishing their goals. Epstein, a psychologist, explains how psychotherapy and Buddhism both believe that ego prevents us from being our best. Using powerful language, he discusses how obstacles can be turned into springboards for greatness.