How To Prevent Copyright Infringement On YouTube

By
Tue, 5 Dec 2017

Preventing copyright infringement is one of the first steps you need to take if you are looking to make money on YouTube. If you're a serial offender, you might want to delete your account and start anew. Once that's done, follow these steps to get your channel on the right track. As long as you make sure you haven't accidentally found yourself on Utube.

  1. Log in
  2. Click the icon in the upper right corner
  3. Click "Creator Studio"
  4. Go to the video manager on the left
  5. Click the copyright notice on the claimed video (below the view counter)
  6. Remove the copyrighted material or file a dispute

What Counts As Fair Use

Example Fair Use Not Fair Use Legal Gray Area
Short film clips in the context of a review
A new song by your favorite artist
Video game Let's Plays
Copyrighted material with a disclaimer
Creative Commons content used extensively

Where To Get Free Footage And Music

What Is Fair Use?

Conclusion

Keeping your content free of copyright claims is a crucial step in becoming a YouTube star. Before you even download free video editing software, you should have a good sense of what you can and cannot do if you want to start uploading videos to the website. With the information above, you will hopefully be able to get started and avoid any costly or contentious legal issues.

In Depth

As a content creator on YouTube, you should always be careful of what videos you upload, especially if they contain other people's work. Uploading copyrighted content could result in a strike on your account, which could lead to its termination. There are a few ways to avoid copyright infringement on YouTube, so let's go through some of them.

Uploading copyrighted content could result in a strike on your account, which could lead to its termination.

First of all, we need to understand what copyright is. Basically, it's a set of rights that gives an author exclusivity over the reproduction and distribution of their work. In the case of YouTube, uploaders automatically own copyright to any of their original content. For the most part, this allows people to control who can reupload or reuse bits of their videos.

Submitting an infringement complaint on YouTube is fairly easy, and there's also an automated system called "Content ID" that scans videos for copyrighted material. If you get caught using someone else's labor without permission, you might get a copyright strike. Once you've received three strikes, your account, and any channels associated with it, will be removed.

Submitting an infringement complaint on YouTube is fairly easy, and there's also an automated system called "Content ID" that scans videos for copyrighted material.

One easy way to avoid copyright infringement is to just refrain from using other people's work. This means recording your own footage, sound effects, and music. Depending on the type of video you're trying to create, that's going to be fairly difficult, which is why you should consider using royalty-free media and stock images or videos.

Depending on the type of video you're trying to create, that's going to be fairly difficult, which is why you should consider using royalty-free media and stock images or videos.

Stock footage is easy to acquire and use for free. There are several sites on the internet that offer a wide selection of free videos and images, such as Pexels and Pixabay. Most, if not all, of the content on these websites are licensed under a "Creative Commons Zero" license. What this means is that their content is free for both personal and commercial use.

What this means is that their content is free for both personal and commercial use.

In the case of royalty-free music, there are several websites and YouTube channels that you can use. One good source for this is NoCopyrightSounds, which is a record label that allows independent creators to use their music for free as long as the artists are properly credited.

One good source for this is NoCopyrightSounds, which is a record label that allows independent creators to use their music for free as long as the artists are properly credited.

Another good source is Incompetech.com, which features a huge selection of songs composed by Kevin MacLeod. He is a well-known composer of royalty-free music. There's a good chance you've already heard of his work without even realizing it.

Another good source is Incompetech.com, which features a huge selection of songs composed by Kevin MacLeod.

YouTube even has its own audio library where you can download music and sound effects for free. This is also very convenient for when one of your videos gets claimed by Content ID. YouTube lets you choose new audio from the library to overlay over the offending song, which allows you to remove the Content ID claim.

This is also very convenient for when one of your videos gets claimed by Content ID.

Another way to avoid copyright infringement on YouTube is to learn how fair use works. If you absolutely have to use someone else's copyrighted content in one of your videos, make sure that it falls under fair use. This is a complicated topic, but the general idea is that any use of copyrighted material must be done in a transformative manner.

Generally, using copyrighted material for the purpose of commentary, criticism, or research will count as fair use. Examples of videos that may be considered fair use are Let's Plays, parodies, and movie reviews that feature short clips of films.

Generally, using copyrighted material for the purpose of commentary, criticism, or research will count as fair use.

One common misconception about copyright infringement is the use of disclaimers. Saying "I do not own the media used in this video" or "All rights go to the creators" will not prevent your video from being taken down. By doing this, you are just admitting that you're potentially violating copyright law.

This is not true.

Even if you have a disclaimer on your video, copyright owners can, and most likely will, report you to YouTube if they catch you using their work without permission. In the case of copyrighted music, this will result in your video being blocked, taken down, or monetized by the owner.

In the case of copyrighted music, this will result in your video being blocked, taken down, or monetized by the owner.

To prevent this, you can simply ask the owner for his or her permission. If you're lucky, they'll let you use what they've made as long as they're properly credited. In most cases though, you'll have to purchase a license.

If you're lucky, they'll let you use what they've made as long as they're properly credited.

Take note that even with a license or the owner's permission, your video can still be claimed by the automated Content ID system. In this case, you should let the copyright owner know about your situation and dispute the claim via YouTube.

In this case, you should let the copyright owner know about your situation and dispute the claim via YouTube.

To do this, just login to your account and click on the icon on the top right corner of the screen. After that, click on "Creator Studio" and go to the video manager located in the menu to your left. Look for the claimed video and click on the copyright notice located below the view counter. From here, you can choose to remove the copyrighted material or file a dispute.

Look for the claimed video and click on the copyright notice located below the view counter.

Disputing a copyright claim is a complicated process, and it's usually best to just reupload a video without the offending material. If you really want or need to use copyrighted material, but are unsure of how fair use works, then you should consider consulting a lawyer.

If you really want or need to use copyrighted material, but are unsure of how fair use works, then you should consider consulting a lawyer.