12 Sidesplittingly Hilarious Novels For All Readers

By
Sat, 4 Aug 2018

Funny books don't just give you a reprieve from life. They can make you a healthier person. Combined with the benefits of reading literature, humorous novels might just be the best way to spend your leisure time. To help in that endeavor, we've compiled twelve novels that will make you laugh, whether you're in need of something for a young teen or something a little edgier. And if you're looking for something a little more fantastical, you can check out these funny books in the sci-fi and fantasy genres. When you click links from this website, we may receive advertising revenue to support our research. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

12 Comic Novels That Will Split Your Sides

  1. The Regulars by Georgia Clark
  2. Touch by Courtney Maum
  3. What in God's Name by Simon Rich
  4. Better Nate Than Ever by Tim Federle
  5. DC Trip by Sara Benincasa
  6. How to Walk Away by Katherine Center
  7. Who's That Girl? by Mhairi McFarlane
  8. Developing Minds: An American Ghost Story by Jonathan LaPoma
  9. Stay by Allie Larkin
  10. At the Stroke of Midnight by Tara Sivec
  11. The Year We Turned Forty by Liz Fenton & Lisa Steinke
  12. Spoiled by Heather Cocks & Jessica Morgan

A Bestselling Author On Balancing Drama And Humor In Novels

In Depth

Reading funny tales can uplift one's mood. It's like the proverb says: "laughter is the best medicine." Several studies have shown that humor is an effective antidote against stress and pain, as it stimulates blood flow, relaxes tense muscles, and brings harmony to our state of mind. That's why we've compiled some of the most side-splittingly hilarious novels for you to read whenever you need a good laugh. In no particular order, here is our list of twelve.

At #1 is "The Regulars," which tells the story of three best friends named Willow, Evie, and Krista. They discover a vial of liquid that changes their physical appearances to drop-dead gorgeous models, and favorable opportunities immediately start to come their way. However, as the girls enjoy their career advancements and celebrity flings, hilarious antics make them realize that looks are not everything and don't equate to happiness. Georgia Clark gives a modern take on relationships, fame, beauty, and sex.

At #2 is "Touch." This heartfelt novel follows the life of Sloane, a trend forecaster who works for a tech giant called "Mammoth." As she leads their annual conference celebrating a newly-invented technology that replaces human interaction, the heroine finds herself in conflict with the direction of her employer. She believes that humanity will still yearn for a warm touch. Written by Courtney Maum, the tale features funny episodes of the protagonist as she longs for physical intimacy in a world full of digitally dependent people.

What we have at #3 is "What in God's Name," which revolves around two angels, Craig and Eliza, both working at "Heaven Incorporated." God decides to destroy the earth and open an Asian fusion restaurant for his retirement, but the two protagonists make a deal with their boss. He will call off Armageddon if they can perform the toughest miracle: getting the two most socially awkward humans on the planet to fall in love. Simon Rich presents an engaging novel full of funny anecdotes that indicate how silly humans can be.

Coming in at #4 is "Better Nate than Ever." Tim Federle gives us a tale of an eighth-grader named Nate who decides to go after his big dreams. Being a misfit in his family, the young boy goes to New York City to audition for a musical while his parents are away from home. Full of hope, joy, and fear, his hilarious and touching adventure to reinvent his life takes him on an unexpected journey of self-discovery. Federle also tackles the subject of sexuality and depicts how homosexuals are perceived by society.

At #5 is "DC Trip," which follows the humorous and explicit happenings during a class field trip to Washington D.C. from New Jersey. Penned by Sara Benincasa, the tale presents hilarious characters. Two chaperone teachers are awkward with each other due to an incident last year. Teenagers plan to take full advantage of the lack of parents. With horny, backstabbing young adults full of witty banter, the narrative features a wild, raunchy adventure that deals with a lot of teen angst and adult drama.

At #6 is "How to Walk Away." In this romantic comedy, Margaret's perfect life vanishes in an instant after a tragic accident. Left paralyzed, the protagonist finds herself in multiple heartbreaking episodes, such as a failing relationship with her fiance, physical rehabilitation with a grumpy therapist, and her estranged sister returning home after years. Katherine Center brings us a story about survival, as she shows how the heroine tries to form a new life with her strength, positive outlook, and sense of humor.

What we have at #7 is "Who's That Girl?" After a disastrous incident left her at the center of a public shaming, Edie accepts a job offer from her boss, which involves going back to her hometown in London. As the protagonist ghostwrites an autobiography for a hot actor named Elliot, Mhairi McFarlane takes readers on a funny and emotional journey full of mayhem and comical conversations. With workplace woes, family drama, and romantic attachments, the novel presents how Edie navigates through a social disaster and finds her way into love.

At #8 is "Developing Minds," which follows the life of Luke, a recent college graduate who lands a job at a low-grade middle school. As he continues living on the margins, Luke thinks his dream of becoming a professional writer is falling apart. He then takes extreme measures to cope with frustration, only to find himself yearning to pursue his purpose even more. Jonathan LaPoma gives us a coming-of-age novel that tackles alienation, misguided hopes, and addiction, making the tale perfect for those who enjoy satire and darker humor.

At #9 is "Stay" by Allie Larkin. After her long-term crush marries her best friend Janie, Van's world comes crashing down. Heartbroken and drunk, she orders a German Shepherd puppy over the internet, only to find a big, trained dog in the package. Larkin engages readers with a quirky story about the healing powers of a pet, and shows how it can act as a catalyst for moving on. With lots of humor, affection, and wit, the narrative features endearing characters while exploring the subjects of loneliness, friendship, and the unconditional love of an animal.

At #10 is "At the Stroke of Midnight," the first book of the Naughty Princess Club series. The story follows the life of Cynthia, a perfect housewife whose husband runs away with all their money. Together with her friends, Ariel and Belle, the heroine attends a Halloween party where they are mistaken for strippers. In dire need of cash, the three ladies pursue stripping and find themselves in humorous situations. Tara Sivec writes strong, independent women in an empowering tale full of angst and funny episodes.

At #11 is "The Year We Turned Forty" by Liz Fenton and Lisa Steinke. This heartwarming novel follows the lives of three best friends who get a chance to relive the pivotal year they turned forty. Jessie wants to keep her husband she lost because of her infidelity. Claire wishes to spend precious time with her mother. And Gabriela changes her mind about having children. All three share a common goal of fixing their past mistakes, in order to alter how their lives turn out in the present.

Finally, at #12 is "Spoiled," which follows the life of Molly Dix. A small-town teenage girl, she discovers her real father is a famous movie star on the day her mother dies. Her dad invites her to live with him in Beverly Hills, and Molly finds herself thrown deep into celebrity culture while clashing with her spoiled half-sister Brooke.

Jessica Morgan and Heather Cocks, collectively known as "The Fug Girls," give us a story full of pop culture references, hilarious one-liners, and crackling dialogue while diving into the glamorous world of Hollywood, fashion, and LA gossip.