What Happened To Connie Chung?

By
Wed, 24 Jan 2018

During her career, Connie Chung has been an anchor and reporter for a wide range of networks, including NBC, CBS, CNN, and more. But since 2006, she hasn't been on television as much. In this guide, we'll discuss what Connie is up to now, and take a look back at her groundbreaking career.

Connie Chung's Career

Year Position Show Network
1983 - 1986 Anchor News at Sunrise NBC
1983 - 1989 Saturday Anchor Nightly News NBC
1989 - 1993 Anchor Sunday Evening News CBS
1993 - 1995 Co-Anchor Evening News CBS
1993 - 1995 Anchor Eye to Eye with Connie Chung CBS
1998 - 2000 Anchor 20/20 ABC
2002 - 2003 Anchor Connie Chung Tonight CNN
2006 Co-Host Weekends with Maury and Connie MSNBC

What is Connie Chung Doing Now?

Weekends with Maury and Connie was the last time Connie had a major role on TV. She has since made appearances on news programs as a "veteran journalist," and has given a number of interviews. But mostly she's been living a quieter life, largely out of the public eye, and spending time with her family. Still, she is by no means retired, and has mentioned that she would consider taking another job on television, if she were to be offered one.

Connie Chung Controversies

  • In a 1995 interview with Kathleen Gingrich, Chung was criticized for prompting Gingrich to say negative things about Hillary Clinton on the record.
  • A few months later, Chung made a sarcastic comment in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing that many viewers felt was distasteful.
  • In 2002, Chung was interviewing Martina Navratilova and controversially called the tennis legend "un-American" and suggested she should "go back to Czechoslovakia."
  • Less serious than her other mis-steps, the 2006 finale of Weekends with Maury and Connie featured Chung singing "Thanks for the Memories" while lying on a piano. Many felt that this performance was off-putting and bizarre.

Connie Chung on Women in Journalism

Conclusion

Connie Chung's career has been a mixed bag of high and low points. While she is often considered a trailblazer who helped lead the way for female and Asian-American news anchors, she is also a controversial figure who has made her fair share of mistakes. While she isn't as publicly active as she used to be, she is still a legend in the world of journalism and her legacy is sure to last for years to come.

In Depth

Plenty of Americans are familiar with Connie Chung. As a prominent journalist and reporter, she has enjoyed a long and at times controversial career. In addition to her strong broadcast presence, she is also married to another famous television personality, Maury Povich. The couple hosted a short-lived news show that was canceled by MSNBC in 2006. This was Connie's last official on air project. Since then, many people have wondered what became of her. We took a look at the extensive career of this famous anchor to find out more.

In addition to her strong broadcast presence, she is also married to another famous television personality, Maury Povich.

Constance Yu-Hwa Chung was born to immigrant parents in Washington D.C. in 1946. The Chung family arrived in America less than a year before her birth. Her father had worked as an intelligence officer with the Chinese Nationalist Government, and her mother was a homemaker. Because she had no brothers, Connie was determined to create a legacy to preserve her family name. As a child, she cultivated an interest in Meteorology. After completing high school she went on to obtain a degree in journalism from the University of Maryland in 1969.

Because she had no brothers, Connie was determined to create a legacy to preserve her family name.

Once she received her degree, Connie immediately took a position as a secretary with WTTG Television in Washington D.C. Months of tireless work followed, and she eventually made her way up to reporter. After two years, she landed a correspondent job with the CBS Evening News hosted by Walter Cronkite. It was the early 1970s, at the height of the notorious Watergate Scandal. Due to her initiative, Connie scored an exclusive interview with President Richard Nixon. Because of this exposure, she was able to make a lasting impression on American viewers.

It was the early 1970s, at the height of the notorious Watergate Scandal.

Chung made her way from Washington D.C. to Los Angeles. Once there, she worked as an anchor for local evening newscasts and primetime updates with various West Coast stations owned by CBS. By 1983, she was back to broadcast news, this time working with NBC. She was featured on a show called "News at Sunrise," which aired right before the well known "Today Show." Connie was also featured during weekend slots and would fill in for Tom Brokaw on weeknights when needed.

By 1983, she was back to broadcast news, this time working with NBC.

When Connie returned to CBS in 1989, she landed her own show. Called "Face to Face," it ran for one year. She also appeared on the Sunday evening news. In the course of a few years, she had truly made a name for herself. The resilient reporter had become the first Asian-American and second woman to ever co-anchor a major network broadcast. Barbara Walters was the first. Later, she was given another show, named "Eye to Eye with Connie Chung."

Barbara Walters was the first.

Connie created controversy when she talked Kathleen Gingrich into saying negative things about Hillary Clinton on the air. At the time, Mrs. Clinton was the First Lady of the United States. Viewers felt that Mrs. Gingrich had been tricked. A few months later, Connie made a sarcastic comment regarding the Oklahoma City bombing. It was not taken lightly, and she was asked to leave the network.

A few months later, Connie made a sarcastic comment regarding the Oklahoma City bombing.

It was then that Connie joined "20/20" on ABC News. Conducting one on one interviews with prominent figures in current affairs became her calling card. She would also host "Good Morning America" sporadically but declined a full time offer. Her work at ABC was followed by unsuccessful jobs at CNN and M.S.N.B.C.. When she and husband Maury Povich hosted a lighthearted weekend news spot in 2006, the show flopped. After airing for only half a year, it was canceled.

When she and husband Maury Povich hosted a lighthearted weekend news spot in 2006, the show flopped.

The final episode featured Chung singing a farewell song. Dressed in a white gown while lying on top of a piano, it was intended to be a self reflective parody. The off key performance was criticized by audiences for being too bizarre. A clip of the performance was one of the first instances of "going viral." It was widely viewed on Youtube, a relatively new website at the time.

A clip of the performance was one of the first instances of "going viral."

Before her doomed show with Maury, Chung had left television voluntarily to raise her family. Since then, she has made occasional appearances on MSNBC and CNN to give her opinion on current affairs. After the United States presidential election of 2016, she stated that she believed Hillary Clinton lost because the public didn't trust her. She further went on to say that the real winner of the election was Donald Trump's counselor, Kellyanne Conway. Chung asserted that Conway manipulated her boss so well that she should've been made Secretary of State.

After the United States presidential election of 2016, she stated that she believed Hillary Clinton lost because the public didn't trust her.

The following year, Connie was inducted into the New Jersey Hall of Fame. She has also won three Emmys, a Peabody and a handful of other awards. In 2011, she was a judge for the Miss Universe Contest. Connie also completed a teaching fellowship with The Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Still married to Povich, the two pursue a kosher lifestyle devoted to Judaism. On occasion she takes interviews, and has joked that she currently just "hangs out" and "sponges off Maury."

In 2011, she was a judge for the Miss Universe Contest.

When asked if she was offered another job on television whether she'd take it, her response was yes. However, the veteran reporter was quick to cast doubt on the likelihood of that ever happening. Because of her age, she joked that the odds would be slim. While she is not officially retired, Chung seems to be enjoying a quiet life outside of the national spotlight. With her hard-working personality, energetic celebrity husband and numerous connections, Connie Chung will likely stay active for some time.

Because of her age, she joked that the odds would be slim.