Updated September 24, 2019 by Daniel Imperiale

The 10 Best Big Face Watches For Men

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 4 times since it was first published in July of 2018. When you want to make a fashion statement, sometimes a regular watch just won't do. These models all feature big faces, adding some punch to the wearer's look, and many show additional data, like the month and date, or display multiple time zones for folks keeping tabs on friends, loved ones or colleagues around the globe. We've ranked them by build quality, movement, complications, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best big face watch for men on Amazon.

10. Stuhrling Original Luxury Dress

9. Orient Mako XL

8. Seiko Suno65 Special Edition

7. Hamilton Jazzmaster

6. Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean Chronograph

5. Grand Seiko Black Ceramic Limited

4. IWC Big Pilot

3. Breitling Navitimer GMT Limited Edition

2. Casio G-Shock Rangeman

1. Panerai Luminor Marina 1950

Special Honors

Rolex Yacht-Master 42 This model eschews the 44mm dial and regatta countdown complication of its previous incarnation, the Yacht-Master II, in favor of a 42mm size and an overall simpler approach. It's very much like the company's Submariner, but with a white gold case attached to an Oysterflex bracelet, this model offers both more sportiness, and more of a stealth wealth approach than the Sub. rolex.com

Editor's Notes

September 11, 2019:

When putting together a list like this, one has to confront what exactly makes a big-faced watch. On a wrist with a 15-centimeter circumference, even modestly sized 38mm dress watches will take up a lot of space, and on the thick wrists of a pro baseball player, Rolex's largest offerings will look average-to-small. With that in mind, we wanted to place our baseline for what makes a watch truly big just above the average size of the world's most popular sports watches — the Rolexes Submariner, GMT, and Daytona, all of which come in at 40mm. As a result, you won't find a watch on this iteration of our list that measures less than 42mm in diameter.

From there, there's a question of taste, which can not be prescribed, but which can be guided, and an adherence to a variety of the better brands on the market is a safe play here, even if it pushes the prices of the list upwards. Nowadays, more men are realizing the importance of spending more than a few hundred dollars on a watch — whether for dress or everyday wear — and there are tons of amazing options that exist well below the luxury price class. These offerings, from brands like Sekio and Orient, come from old, storied companies who help keep the lights on with cheap quartz-powered offerings, but who also spend the time and the money to develop fine automatic timepieces for a range of budgets.

In our special honors section, you'll find a model from Rolex — perhaps the most storied company out there. It's not their biggest watch, as that honor goes to their Yachtmaster II, but the new Yachtmaster (yes, their current YM came out after the YMII) is a nicer watch in ever respect, even if it only comes in at 42mm.


Daniel Imperiale
Last updated on September 24, 2019 by Daniel Imperiale

Daniel Imperiale holds a bachelor’s degree in writing, and proudly fled his graduate program in poetry to pursue a quiet life at a remote Alaskan fishery. After returning to the contiguous states, he took up a position as an editor and photographer of the prestigious geek culture magazine “Unwinnable” before turning his attention to the field of health and wellness. In recent years, he has worked extensively in film and music production, making him something of a know-it-all when it comes to camera equipment, musical instruments, recording devices, and other audio-visual hardware. Daniel’s recent obsessions include horology (making him a pro when it comes to all things timekeeping) and Uranium mining and enrichment (which hasn’t proven useful just yet).


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