Updated October 23, 2018 by Brett Dvoretz

The 5 Best Flea Collars For Cats

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This wiki has been updated 16 times since it was first published in October of 2016. Keeping a cat free from pests is easier said than done, especially if he doesn't appreciate being doused with shampoos or liquid treatments. These collars, on the other hand, are easy to put on, can keep fleas and ticks at bay, and many even break off safely if they get snagged on something. Be sure to watch your pet closely, though, because some animals react poorly to certain ingredients used. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best flea collar for cats on Amazon.

5. Zodiac Breakaway

4. Ultimate Repel

3. Bayer Seresto

2. Ergmy Leoffy

1. Perozek Natural

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Editor's Notes

October 18, 2018:

We removed the Hartz Ultra Guard because many pet owners found their pets having allergic reactions to it. We added the Furzy Botanical since it's effective on both dogs and cats making it useful for multi-pet households. We also included the Zodiac Breakway, appreciating that it starts to work the second it touches your animal's fur.

Why A Collar Is The Best Flea Solution

At least with a flea collar, if you suspect your pet isn't reacting well to it, you can simply remove it.

With so many options when it comes to flea control, between spot-on formulas, pills, sprays, and more, it can be hard to know which one is the best for your feline. Finding the most effective solution is important to prevent both fleas and the complications they come with, like allergic dermatitis and more. Collars offer a lot of benefits that the other products do not. Let's start with spot-on solutions applied directly to the pet's skin. Though these can be helpful, there are too many factors that can interfere with their potency. Should an animal get wet or roll around in mud, it's possible for the solution to come off his fur.

Another flaw in topical solutions is that you may not get your cat to stay still while you apply the product. We know pets are emotionally complex, and cats have a tendency to play hard to get, so if simply snuggling with Fluffy for a short period of time is a challenge, giving him a topical treatment will be even harder. If you use a collar, all you need is for your kitty to sit still for a few seconds while you put it on, and you don't need to worry about it rubbing off when your pet plays.

Oral medications are another possible ally against fleas, but they also come with their own problems. Your animal may simply not take a pill. You can try hard to hide it in his favorite treat or crush it up and put it in his food, but he may outsmart you and sniff out the odd ingredient. If he does ingest it, he may throw it up immediately. There is also, of course, the risk of side effects from any oral medication. With many pills remaining effective for several months, there's no going back once your pet takes them. At least with a flea collar, if you suspect your pet isn't reacting well to it, you can simply remove it. Flea collars are a great choice for those seeking something that is both successful at repelling and eliminating fleas, without the need for prescription pills.

How To Select A Flea Collar

There are a variety of flea collars available, so finding the one that's best for your meowing companion should be easy. Fleas aren't the only pests attacking your four-legged buddy, though, so consider a collar that also fights ticks. These nasty insects can cause problems like Lyme disease, which can be life-threatening. When dealing with insects, you want to make sure your cat is protected against every life stage of the pest. Ideally, you want a collar that not only prevents new fleas from making a meal out of your cat, but also kills existing ones, and any eggs they may have laid. If you do suspect fleas have already left eggs around, make sure to use a home spray in addition to the collar to prevent an infestation.

Fleas aren't the only pests attacking your four-legged buddy, though, so consider a collar that also fights ticks.

Active cats who spend a lot of time outdoors should have a collar with a reflective surface, so that cars and cyclists can spot it in the dark. If you are sensitive to your local wildlife, you may want a collar that won't kill off any surrounding bugs — only the ones who jump directly onto your kitty. If Fluffy has sensitive skin, you may consider a hypoallergenic collar, or one free of harsh chemicals, to avoid irritation. These are also a smart choice for households with children. Meanwhile, if you're sensitive to smell, you may want a collar that doesn't produce any strong odors. Should there be any possibility of your kitty being caught out in the rain, or if you like to give your cat regular baths, find a water-resistant design.

Consider how long flea season is where you live. While in colder climates it can be quite short, hotter areas can suffer flea seasons that last up to seven months. Fortunately, there are collars that come in multi-packs to keep your cat covered throughout the pesky time of year. Since your feline friend may go through weight fluctuations, you might want a model that is easy to adjust to various lengths. No matter how your cat likes to spend her days, there is a flea collar suited for her.

How And Where Your Cat Gets Fleas

If Cupcake spends most of her day in her cat house, only leaving it to use her litter box or nibble on kibble, you may wonder where she picks up her fleas. However, it only takes a brief interaction with these infuriating insects to put your cat at risk for an infestation. A common way cats can get fleas is from your dog, so if you have a diverse brood of pets in your home, make sure they're all protected. Both canines and kitties should wear collars, so as to not put each other at risk of fleas.

That being said, a few brave ones can come in and carry parasites with them.

There's another animal who could be bringing fleas into your house, and this one you didn't invite in: rodents. The relationship between cats and rats is a complicated one and, in most cases, rats will stay away from homes where felines live. That being said, a few brave ones can come in and carry parasites with them. Make sure to put screens on all windows, cover up any holes in basements or the foundation of your home, and put up humane rat traps around your property. While you can likely count on your cat to attack a rodent, a flea on said rodent could jump onto Fluffy in the process.

Your kitty doesn't only interact with other animals in her home. If she goes to the vet, travels to a neighbor's yard, or has a playdate with another feline, she can easily pick up fleas. You can't, of course, keep a sociable cat in the house all day, completely isolated from other four-legged friends. That's why it's especially important to take preventative measures, like putting on a collar.

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Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on October 23, 2018 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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