Updated January 18, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

The 10 Best Guitar Amplifier Cabinets

video play icon
Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

We spent 24 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. While the days of huge stacks are (mostly) long gone, it's still common practice to route a guitar through an amplifier then to a standalone set of speakers. This gives an artist complete control over the sound as it enters the mix, ensuring that their creative expression comes out exactly as desired. Whatever volume level you're after, the right cabinet will let you be heard, loud and clear. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best guitar amplifier cabinet on Amazon.

10. Fender Hot Rod

9. Eden SC4

8. Marshall MX412B

7. Vox Extension

6. HeadRush FRFR112

5. Yamaha THRC 212

4. Ibanez Tube Screamer

3. Fender Super Champ

2. Laney Cub Cab

1. Bugera One

Editor's Notes

January 15, 2019:

How good your guitar sounds is incredibly dependent on the quality of your cabinet. Products from Fender and Marshall are especially popular among rock groups, partially because their mid-range lends itself well to intense soloing. The Eden is great for a variety of styles, and promises to really pump up the volume, should you so desire. It's hard to go wrong with the Bugera, which is surprisingly light, especially in light of its resilience and respectably high max volume. The Laney looks every bit as good as it sounds, and if you can afford the premium price, the Vox is simply one of richest and loudest you'll find. Modern guitarists who rely heavily on digital audio manipulation may just love the HeadRush, which affords the lead player an exceptionally clean monitor and mix output.


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on January 18, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


Thanks for reading the fine print. About the Wiki: We don't accept sponsorships, free goods, samples, promotional products, or other benefits from any of the product brands featured on this page, except in cases where those brands are manufactured by the retailer to which we are linking. For our full ranking methodology, please read about us, linked below. The Wiki is a participant in associate programs from Amazon, Walmart, Ebay, Target, and others, and may earn advertising fees when you use our links to these websites. These fees will not increase your purchase price, which will be the same as any direct visitor to the merchant’s website. If you believe that your product should be included in this review, you may contact us, but we cannot guarantee a response, even if you send us flowers.