Updated April 11, 2020 by Daniel Imperiale

The 10 Best Invicta Watches For Men

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This wiki has been updated 11 times since it was first published in July of 2018. Whether you are looking for something formal or casual, Invicta has got you covered. Their catalogue features a wide array of designs and sizes, with plenty of watches for men who prefer a little more heft on their wrist than others. We've included models suitable for adventurous use, everyday wear, and even black tie occasions, ranked here by accuracy, build quality, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best invicta watch for men on Amazon.

10. Grand Diver Disney Limited Edition

9. Ion-Plated Pro Diver 17885

8. Speedway 24209

7. Pro Diver 30627

6. Force Collection 1515

5. Subaqua Noma III

4. Pro Diver Two-tone

3. Reserve Chronograph

2. Objet D Art Automatic

1. S1 Rally Automatic Open Heart

Special Honors

DC Comics Batman It doesn't have any fancy gadgets built into it, but this officially licensed model does sport a big bat logo right in the middle of the dial. Flourishes of yellow accent an otherwise muted color scheme, appearing on the hands and the knurled crown. It runs on a simple quartz movement with a small subdial for seconds at six o'clock. invictawatch.com

Objet D Art 32743 Designed to straddle the light between a sports model and something suitable for, well, a suit, this offering boasts a predominantly steel construction that's been blacked out, and an automatic movement you can see from either side of the dial. A deployment clasp helps being the bracelet one step closer to the luxury class, as well. invictawatch.com

Reserve Venom 32675 And open work diver's model, this piece provides a dashed elapsed time bezel that counts as many as 20 minutes, as well as a small cutaway that reveals a portion of the automatic movement powering the time and directly attached to an arrow indicating the seconds as they tick by. Its two-tone gold and steel bracelet is complimented nicely by a pearlescent dial. invictawatch.com

Editor's Notes

April 09, 2020:

Invicta certainly has its lovers and haters in the watch community, and I see where both sides are coming from. For a long time, the company seemed pretty content to somewhat flagrantly steal design elements from much more expensive watches and put just enough of a spin on them to call them their own. You still see that today in models like the Pro Diver 30627, which takes so much from Rolex's GMT Master II. But let's be honest. That Rolex retails for over $10,000, and that's if you can find one. Wait lists through authorized dealers are currently ranging into years. Now, you're not getting anywhere near the quality of movement, finishing, accuracy, or build quality you'd see from the Rollie, but it could be something to hold you over until you with raise the capital or hear back from your dealer that the real thing is finally in stock.

And Invicta have taken strides to pull more from horological history in recent years, as opposed to specific designs from other brands. That why something like the Force Collection 1515 can feel simultaneously new and familiar. It plays with elements that grew out of military pilot watch designs in the middle of the 20th century, like a leftie crown and pusher placement, oversized numbers, and a tachymeter chronograph. But it doesn't feel like every other pilot's watch. It has a character of its own.

The company has an absolutely enormous catalogue, but that doesn't mean they keep everything on the books. That's why we had to send off models like the Grand Diver 3044 and the Specialty 90242-001, neither of which are currently on offer from Invicta. We found a nice replacement for each however, with a good diver in the Subaqua Noma III and a dress option in the Objet D Art Automatic.


Daniel Imperiale
Last updated on April 11, 2020 by Daniel Imperiale

Daniel Imperiale holds a bachelor’s degree in writing, and proudly fled his graduate program in poetry to pursue a quiet life at a remote Alaskan fishery. After returning to the contiguous states, he took up a position as an editor and photographer of the prestigious geek culture magazine “Unwinnable” before turning his attention to the field of health and wellness. In recent years, he has worked extensively in film and music production, making him something of a know-it-all when it comes to camera equipment, musical instruments, recording devices, and other audio-visual hardware. Daniel’s recent obsessions include horology (making him a pro when it comes to all things timekeeping) and Uranium mining and enrichment (which hasn’t proven useful just yet).


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