The 10 Best Acoustic Panels

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 5 times since it was first published in July of 2018. Applying the right acoustic treatment is the most important step in creating an effective recording space. Whether your goal is to isolate the process, keep external distractions out, or control high frequencies and minimize reverberations, there's a panel made specifically to help your studio or home theater sound as good as possible. Be careful to handle them as per manufacturer's guidelines. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best acoustic panel on Amazon.

10. Auralex Sonolite

9. Kusa R3

8. Auralex Sustain Metro

7. Burton SuperDense

6. Primacoustic Cloud

5. Jocavi Basmel Twist

4. FStop Labs 12-Pack

3. UA Acoustics Skyross

2. Owens Corning 703

1. Roxul Rockboard

Editor's Notes

September 25, 2019:

First of all, it's important to understand what acoustic panels are for. They don't help with soundproofing almost in any way; they're designed to minimize airborne sound, which is generally mid-range vibrations that lead to echo, reverb, and other unwanted noise. As long as you understand what they do, there are plenty of worthwhile options. The most straightforward is the typical foam kind like the FStop 12-Pack, which costs very little and is easy to use. Then there are DIY-style materials like Owens Corning 703, Burton SuperDense, and the Roxul Rockboard. All three of these are very popular among studio designers, the Roxul being the most commonly used.

If you want something that looks as good as it sounds, there are just as many choices, though they tend to be considerably more expensive. The Skyross, Auralex Sustain, and Kusa all use real wood as a base; the Skyross mixes prepared MDF with foam for a response consistent with more high-tech panels, and the Kusa uses actual cork as a dampener, adding to its classy appearance. The Auralex Sustain doesn't use anything aside from bamboo, so it will work best in conjunction with other foam panels elsewhere in the studio. Once you've properly treated the room, you can help make the most of its acoustics by picking up a high-quality microphone as well as an isolation shield.


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on September 29, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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