10 Best Bagless Vacuums | March 2017

We spent 33 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Let's face it - nobody likes house cleaning. That being said, one of the best ways to make this chore easier and more hassle-free is to use a bagless vacuum. The options on this list includes those with canisters that let you see exactly how full they're getting, and can easily be emptied at the touch of a button. If you're tired of dealing with unwieldy, expensive bags, here's a better way. Skip to the best bagless vacuum on Amazon.
10 Best Bagless Vacuums | March 2017


Overall Rank: 9
Best Mid-Range
★★★
Overall Rank: 3
Best High-End
★★★★
Overall Rank: 7
Best Inexpensive
★★★
10
The Eureka AirSpeed AS3008A is engineered with an efficient air path that has limited bends and turns for increased airflow and reduced clogging. It provides a deep cleaning wherever dirt hides, but at 14 pounds, it's cumbersome to carry up and down the stairs.
9
The Samsung VU3000 uses Cyclone Force Dual technology to separate dust from debris, which helps to extend the life of your filters. The lightweight, detachable canister pod makes it a perfect choice for cleaning lots of stairs or curtains.
8
The Hoover Linx BH50010 has edge-cleaning bristles that make it great for getting dirt alongside walls, and the wide cleaning path cuts down on the time you spend cleaning. The low profile base lets it get underneath furniture, so you don't have to move couches around.
7
If you mainly have hardwood floors in your home, then the 10-amp motor on the Dirt Devil SD20505 is perfect for quick pickups. It has a large canister that collects lots of dirt and dust, cutting down on how often you have to empty it.
  • powerful suction for a stick vacuum
  • lightweight and easy to maneuver
  • very noisy when in use
Brand Dirt Devil
Model SD20505
Weight 8.1 pounds
6
If you don't like dancing with a power cord while you vacuum, then check out the Hoover Air BH51120PC. It uses a lithium ion battery that provides around 50 minutes of use per charge, so you can clean your whole house without ever worrying about getting tangled up.
  • eight-foot cleaning reach
  • comes with a backup battery
  • suction not as strong as other vacs
Brand Hoover
Model BH51120PC
Weight 20.5 pounds
5
The ultra-lightweight Shark Navigator SV1106 offers cordless convenience in a stylish package for every area of your home. It is ideal for pet owners, as it works on both carpet and hard floors to get rid of any unwanted hair and can even pick up kitty litter.
  • charges within 4 hours
  • extra-large dust cup
  • not as durable as we'd like
Brand SharkNinja
Model SV1106
Weight 10.8 pounds
4
The Hoover WindTunnel UH70120 has a 5-position height adjustment, so it can handle everything from bare floors to thick shag. The automatic cord retraction makes it easy to put it away when you're done, and you can store all the attachments on the cleaner itself.
  • indicator shows when to check filter
  • upholstery attachment is effective
  • sealed canister prevents odors
Brand Hoover
Model UH70120
Weight 21.6 pounds
3
If you need to get into nooks and crannies, then the Dyson Ball Multi Floor steers easily into difficult areas using its swivel ball design. It has washable HEPA filters that are easy to get to, so you won't have to take the whole thing apart every time you clean it.
  • self-adjusting cleaner head
  • certified allergy friendly
  • instant release wand
Brand Dyson
Model 206900-01
Weight 22.3 pounds
2
The Bissell CleanView has an innovative brush design that rotates down into the carpet for more thorough suction on the initial pass, and the washable foam tank filter makes cleanup a breeze. It's very reasonably priced as well, making it an excellent all-around option.
  • turbo brush tool
  • powerful enough for pet hair
  • wide cleaning head
Brand Bissell
Model 9595A
Weight 19.4 pounds
1
The Shark Lift-Away Speed has a lightweight, detachable canister that lets you get into tight spaces easily without straining your back. It comes with a DustAway hard floor attachment and a washable microfiber pad, so it works just as well on hardwood floors as on carpet.
  • led lights reveal hidden dirt
  • fingertip controls to switch modes
  • swivel steering for great mobility
Brand SharkNinja
Model NV682
Weight 27.7 pounds

Bags Be Gone: Innovation In The Making

Similar to most traditional vacuums, a bagless vacuum cleaner still makes use of an internal centrifugal fan to create suction for picking up contaminants from both floors and upholstery. Its fundamental differences lie in its use of internal filters to separate the dust and debris from clean air as well as its use of a plastic collection cup to gather the debris during a vacuuming session.

Some bagless vacuums are capable of removing particulates from the air through cyclonic separation. This process causes intake air to accelerate to such a speed that dust and other particulates are forced out of the air and into a collection bin. Bagless vacuums utilizing this type of action with filters are referred to as cyclonic models, while those using only filters are considered non-cyclonic in operation.

Non-cyclonic bagless vacuums have several major parts, including the inlet, collection bin, high-efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA), a motor unit, and an outlet grille for releasing clean air back into the room. The inlet normally attaches to the vacuum's cleaning head, while the collection bin is located toward the front of the unit. The HEPA filter is a cylinder of folded paper attached to the base of the collection bin. Air is sucked through the HEPA filter and only the dirt is left behind in the collection bin. The motor unit is also located near the base of the vacuum and powers its suction.

Cyclonic vacuums, such as those designed by Dyson Ltd, include similar parts with the addition of a cyclone component. The cyclone attachment takes the form of a tapering, cone-shaped piece of plastic with many holes at the top. When the electric motor is active, dirty air is first sucked up to the top of the large cyclone where it whirls around at very high speeds. While the air is drawn through the cone holes, dirt and debris are separated out and fall to the bottom of the vacuum's collection bin. The somewhat cleaner air that is still remaining then passes through a second level of cyclonic filtration through a series of smaller cyclone components. These smaller cyclones remove much finer dirt particles from the air. Finally, this clean air passes through two HEPA filters before it is blown back into the room.

Regardless of whether a bagless vacuum is cyclonic or non-cyclonic, it is typically more cost-effective than its bagged counterparts, since the user doesn't have to worry about the expense of replacement bags. The collection bin can simply be emptied, cleaned, and reused for the life of the machine. As a vacuum bag fills up, the device's performance and efficiency are compromised. This places further strain on the vacuum's electric motor, which doesn't occur with bagless operation. It's also difficult to know exactly when a vacuum bag is full without a visual indicator. By contrast, a clear plastic collection bin on a bagless vacuum is easy to see, allowing the user to determine when it needs to be emptied and cleaned.

Convenience And Ease While Vacuuming

A vacuum cleaner with a traditional collection bag is somewhat counterproductive to the whole purpose of cleaning in the first place. The goal of a vacuum is to suck up and discard dirt, dust, and other contaminants from the floor, not to store them inside a bag until it reaches capacity and requires removal and replacement for an additional expense.

A bagged vacuum cleaner ends up blowing at least some amount of dirty, dusty air back into a room where it is redeposited onto the floor. This detraction paves the way for the use of a bagless vacuum in one's home.

Because a vacuum cleaner can be a large device to handle, both power and ease of maneuverability should be two of the most important considerations when investing in a bagless unit. The vacuum's components should also be easy to access (e.g. emptying the collection tray).

Many bagless vacuums offer cordless operation while running on lithium batteries among other types. This makes it much easier to use the device in multiple rooms, so it's worth investing in one with a reliable battery life for extended use.

One must also be sure to look for a bagless model with adjustable height options, particularly if the device will be used on both hard floors and rugs throughout the house.

A Brief History Of Bagless Vacuums

The concept of the vacuum cleaner dates back to Chicago inventor Ives W. McGaffey and his 1868 device called the Whirlwind. This device was quite bulky and worked with a belt-driven fan that had to be cranked by hand across the floor, which made it awkward and cumbersome to operate. Suffering from both allergies and asthma, Melville R. Bissell of Grand Rapids, Michigan invented the first successful mechanical carpet sweeper in 1876.

The first motorized vacuum cleaner was developed by British inventor Hubert Cecil Booth in 1901, which Booth called the Puffing Billy. Booth's device was large and originally powered by an oil engine before being developed into an electric model. However, both of Booth's models were bulky and required transport by horse-drawn carriage. By 1907, an Ohio department store janitor named James Murray Spangler invented the first portable electric vacuum cleaner and was granted a patent for what he called the electric suction sweeper in 1908.

Funding problems forced Spangler to sell his patent to leather goods manufacturer William Henry Hoover, who redesigned Spangler's machine to include a steel casing, casters, and attachments. Hoover then founded the Hoover Company in 1922, which is still one of the most successful vacuum manufacturers today.

Following World War Two, vacuum cleaners became more common for the middle class. The end of the twentieth century saw further advancements in vacuuming technology, including cyclonic dirt separation, which was pioneered by James Dyson in the early 1980s as one of the first bagless vacuums, which are still popular today.



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Last updated: 03/30/2017 | Authorship Information

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