Updated February 25, 2021 by Chris Gillespie

The 10 Best Basin Wrenches

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This wiki has been updated 7 times since it was first published in June of 2019. If you need to install a sink in the bathroom this weekend, forget about using those old channel-locks and grab one of these basin wrenches instead. They clamp onto nuts and bolts securely and don't require a lot of clearance in order to turn, allowing you to navigate the tight spaces under your fixtures. They're so easy to use, you may just decide to remodel the kitchen while you're at it. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki.

1. Ridgid 46753

2. Tekton WRN92002

3. General Tools 140XL

Editor's Notes

February 24, 2021:

Installing a new faucet onto an existing basin can be a tricky procedure due to restricted access behind the pedestal. These basin wrenches have an elongated design with angled grappling hooks at one end and a tightening arm at the other, and are specifically designed to fit into the narrow recess and grip the shallow nut often used on faucets and modern mixer valves.

In this most recent update, we removed several options due to poor customer reviews and replaced them with more durable and versatile models. The Wolverine PST151, the LDR 511, and the Superior Tool 03812, all have a similar design to the Hautmec PL0024 and the Tekton WRN92002, the latter of which features an extending arm and a spring-loaded jaw. In their place, we selected models with different functions to broaden their scope of versatility. The Faithfull BW1 is a fixed jaw option that is probably the easiest to use and has a narrow footprint, however at only 10 inches in length it does lack reach. The PRCI Special, on the other hand, has a 14-inch shaft with a hollow center, making it a good choice for faucets with long threaded rods. It also comes with several interchangeable sockets for nut sizes of 8- to 14-millimeters. The Stanley Adjustable can be a little difficult to get the hang of, as it doesn't have spring-loaded jaws, however, once mastered its ability to tighten nuts at peculiar angles make it an indispensable tool for tradesmen and DIY enthusiasts alike.

June 24, 2019:

The Ridgid 46753 is in a class by itself to a certain extent, as it has several more features than its competition. This makes it easy and comfortable to use, but also drives the price up a little bit. We'd certainly recommend it for pros, but if you only plan on using the wrench a few times, you may prefer to save the extra money.

If you already own more tools than you can store properly, the Superior Tool 03825 will give you the ability to work on sinks without adding too much bulk to your toolbox. It's extremely compact, as it only contains the "essential" part of the wrench. You do need to supply your own ratchet, but we assumed that anyone looking at a tool as specialized as a basin wrench would likely have several ratchets lying around already.

The Ridgid EZ Change and Vorida Basic are outliers on this list to a certain extent. They don't have the traditional basin wrench construction, but they still fulfill the same purpose. Made of thick plastic, they're just as durable as the other models shown here, but they extend in a straight line instead of utilizing a perpendicular T-bar. This makes it easier to work in tight spaces, but at the cost of a little bit of torque.

Special Honors

Rothenberger This company has been developing and producing tools for use in the plumbing sector for over 60 years, offering one of the most comprehensive lines of premium pipe tools and machines. The Rothenberger basin wrench has a strong shaft and self-locating spring-loaded jaw for a firm hold on the fitting prior to turning, and comes with a corrosion-resistant zinc plating. rothenberger.com

4. Superior Tool 03825

5. Ridgid EZ Change

6. Hautmec PL0024

7. PRCI Special

8. Vorida Basic

9. Stanley Adjustable

10. Faithfull BW1


Chris Gillespie
Last updated on February 25, 2021 by Chris Gillespie

Starting his career in the building industry, Chris built and managed a plumbing and heating company in northern England. After 13 years, seeking a more fulfilling lifestyle, he moved to southeast Asia, eventually settling in Vietnam, where he teaches writing and comprehension at a number of international universities. Drawing on his previous experience, and his passion for kitesurfing and windsurfing, Chris is knowledgeable in all things water related both recreationally and within the construction industry.


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