Updated January 14, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

The 9 Best Bluetooth Range Extenders

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

We spent 26 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Currently in its 5th iteration, Bluetooth has completely changed the way we consume media and transfer data, though, like any wireless technology, it has its pitfalls. One drawback is that the relatively underpowered radios integrated within many devices simply can't push a signal very far. The right long-range transmitter will extend the maximum distance to 60 feet or more. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best bluetooth range extender on Amazon.

9. Miccus MHRTX-20

8. BT Magic 3-in-1

7. 1Mii B06 Plus

6. HomeSpot 258LR

5. Gold Armour Long Range

4. Soulcker Adapter

3. Avantree Oasis Plus

2. 1Mii B03 Pro

1. Anker Soundsync

Editor's Notes

January 06, 2019: We know you might be upset that most new phones lack a headphone jack. But don't get mad; get Bluetooth! Seriously though, if you're on the fence about ditching the wires, know that the compression used by Bluetooth to transmit audio is remarkable efficient, and very few listeners will notice a difference in quality compared to wired connections. In fact, if you're over 40, you almost certainly won't be able to tell a difference between a plugged-in set of headphones, and one using the high-definition AptX codec. The company called Anker was formed by a former Google employee fed up with poor-quality imported products, and like most of their stuff, the SoundSync is a top-quality device. Avantree is another very well-known, yet low-cost brand. 1Mii's releases tend to have relatively straightforward, self-explanatory controls, making them relatively convenient to use. BT Magic, Soulcker, and Gold Armor aren't very well-known brands, but their transmitters receive quite good reviews. And the HomeSpot is one of the only reliable pre-paired sets we found, which is more suited to some home entertainment systems, though possibly not quite as versatile as two-in-models.


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on January 14, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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