Updated May 05, 2021 by Christopher Thomas

The 9 Best Camping Stools

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This wiki has been updated 5 times since it was first published in March of 2020. When heading into the great outdoors, you can’t always be sure whether the terrain you're dealing with will be dry, level, or comfortable. The best camping stools are made with this in mind, and those listed here are some of the strongest and most versatile available. But before you enjoy a seat in nature, consider what will work best for you, since every option has its pluses and minuses. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki.

1. TravelChair Slacker

2. GCI Outdoor Tripod

3. Alps Mountaineering Tri-Leg

Editor's Notes

May 04, 2021:

Very few recent changes to this category as a whole. Removed a pair of utility stools from Beckworth & Co. that we decided won't serve much purpose on a camping trip. Otherwise, we updated the Sitpack 2.0, which now comes with a neoprene carrying cover that also functions as a pad. This is a pretty interesting piece of gear, because you can take it camping or backpacking, and you can also find myriad other uses for it like taking a load off during long days at trade shows or amusement parks.

If you're looking for a tripod, the TravelChair Slacker remains our top choice due to comfort and durability. The GCI Outdoor Tripod is ever so slightly behind it in terms of comfort, but at only 1.3 pounds, the GCI is just about the lightest out there. We also want to point out the Rothco Folding, which is a timeless design that's been around for decades and can last for many years with proper care.

March 15, 2020:

When outdoors enthusiasts are preparing for the dangers excursions into nature might entail, they’re not usually thinking about what sort of curveballs travel furniture might throw their way. While camp stools present a limited threat, users should still remain cautious and vigilant. Be sure to check the stability of your stool before sitting, and, as with any chair, whether your own sofa or your grandma’s patio rocker, do not just throw all your weight onto it at once expecting it to support you. If your camp stool’s seat gives out, you risk serious injury, even impalement.

Ideally, the strong poly-fabric seat of your stool won’t rip or tear. However, as durable as such textiles are, regular outdoor use will expose them to ever changing weather, direct sunlight, and other conditions that may cause them to dry-rot over and/or weaken over time. Always check all outdoor gear before and after use, and be sure to both clean and store it according to its manufacturer’s guidelines. Lastly, while polyesters are not highly flammable, they can catch fire, so be sure to keep your camp stool a safe distance from any heat sources, as it could melt if too hot, potentially burning you with napalm-like drippage. When out in nature for extended periods, it is always advisable to have a small fire extinguisher on hand as well as a first aid kit.

On a final note, the Yolafe Portable Seat, the Rothco Folding, and TravelChair Slacker all have California Prop. 65 warning, meaning they likely use PVC in their design. It is not exactly clear where or how certain known carcinogens are used in the construction of each of these stools. While PVC is a known carcinogen, its perils generally comes down to inhalation and/or ingestion, so we leave threat assessment up to you.

4. Sitpack 2.0

5. Yolafe Portable Seat

6. Geertop Tripod

7. Rothco Folding

8. Stansport Deluxe

9. Aillovcol Mini


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on May 05, 2021 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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