Updated June 24, 2020 by Rafael Perez

The 10 Best Field Sharpeners

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This wiki has been updated 18 times since it was first published in October of 2015. Perfect for hunters, campers, fishermen, and hikers, these versatile field sharpeners will maintain a honed edge on all of your gear without adding much weight or bulk to your kit. Our selection includes models capable of working with flat and serrated knives, chef's blades, hatchets, hunting arrows, and even fishing hooks. Be mindful of your finger positions while sharpening to avoid injury. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best field sharpener on Amazon.

10. Wamery Tactical

9. Lansky BowSharp

8. Smith's Jiffy-Pro 50185

7. Smith's PP1 Pocket Pal

6. Smith's CCD4

5. Benchmade AD1089

4. Kershaw Ultra-Tek

3. Lansky Puck

2. Lansky BladeMedic

1. DMT FWEF Diafold

Editor's Notes

June 18, 2020:

Removed the BlizeTec 3-in-1 because of availability issues. Removed the Work Sharp WSGSS because it is too large to be considered a 'field sharpener'. Removed the Work Sharp WSGFS221 because it is an exact replica of the Benchmade AD1089. Added the Lansky Puck, the Kershaw Ultra-Tek, and the Wamery Tactical.

If I'm at home, I'll use a large stone to sharpen everything except for my largest edged tools. But if I'm on a camping or hunting trip, I take my Kershaw Ultra-Tek. Since the steel screws into the aluminum body, it actually takes up very little space. But when you set it up for sharpening, it actually feels quite long and so you can get a comfortable stroke going.

For axes and hatchets, I can't recommend the Lansky Puck enough. The two grits on a single puck are really helpful for getting an edge back. What I like most about it is that it fits nicely in the palm of your hand so you can actually move the puck on the edge instead of having to move the edge on the puck. This is important since it difficult to move large tools like axes in the ways that you need to get them sharp. If I've really neglected my axe or I've caused a nick on the edge, I just take a flat file and work the nicks out. Then I'll set it with the coarse side and finish it off with the medium side of the puck.

Sharpening knives is very dangerous. Make sure you keep your fingers out of the way of the knife strokes and practice very slowly until you gain the experience to sharpen faster.


Rafael Perez
Last updated on June 24, 2020 by Rafael Perez

Rafael Perez is a doctoral candidate in philosophy at the University of Rochester. His primary focus is the metaphysics of time and the philosophy of mind, with a particular interest in artificial intelligence and antirepresentational models of the mind. He has extensive experience as a mechanic, a construction worker, and a general repairman. This has allowed him to gather a wealth of knowledge on automobile repair, auto parts, carpentry, masonry, welding, and the tools used in those trades. In his spare time, he enjoys playing guitar, woodworking, and fishing.


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