Updated May 20, 2020 by Brendon Hannaford

The 6 Best Fuse Pullers

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This wiki has been updated 4 times since it was first published in April of 2020. If you're frequently pulling fuses while working on cars or other electrical systems, a dedicated tool is a big step up from a regular pair of pliers. Rounded cutouts and protruding clips make it easier to firmly grasp a fuse, as well as prevent it from slipping out after extraction. Regardless of which model you choose, always be careful when working with high voltages and currents. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best fuse puller on Amazon.

6. Baomain Extraction Tool

5. Brady 65279

4. Ideal Safe-T-Grip

3. Cooper Bussmann BP-FP-2

2. Gardner Bender FPE-20

1. Jonard Tools FP-600

Editor's Notes

May 17, 2020:

When it comes to purchasing a dedicated fuse pulling tool, it's important to consider what type of fuses you'll be dealing with most of the time.

For instance, if you're primarily dealing with cartridge type fuses or any other cylindrical variety, options such as the Gardner Bender FPE-20, Ideal Safe-T-Grip, and Cooper Bussmann BP-FP-2 are worth considering since they are specifically built for this purpose.

Many car owners may be almost exclusively dealing with more rectangular blade type fuses. While the aforementioned models may still be more useful than a standard pair of pliers for these because of their pincer shaped jaws, models such as the Baomain Extraction Tool and Jonard Tools FP-600 are better suited for this task. While the Baomain model firmly grasps fuses by clipping under the plastic lip around their top, the Jonard Tools has 2 notches which allow you to grab the plastic lip with the full strength of your hand. The benefit of this design, which is essentially a modified pair of needle nose pliers, is that the cutouts are rounded in such a way that they can also adequately handle cylindrical fuses within a certain range.

Whichever model you choose, always be careful when dealing with high voltages or currents. Many manufacturers recommend only removing or installing fuses when circuits are completely de-energized, and it's best to follow this recommendation whenever possible.

In addition to fuse pullers, we also have articles on other electrical and automotive tools such as multimeters, battery chargers, and even full tool sets.


Brendon Hannaford
Last updated on May 20, 2020 by Brendon Hannaford

After graduating from UC Santa Cruz in 2019 with a bachelors in Literature and Creative Writing, Brendon Hannaford moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in comedy and television. Beyond writing, he’s always had a passionate interest in the clever engineering found in consumer electronics and machinery, with an eclectic interest that spans diverse categories such as photography equipment, musical instruments, and automotive technology. When not writing and researching for Ezvid Wiki, Brendon spends his time performing sketch comedy and tinkering with his motorcycle.


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