The 10 Best Manga Books

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Junji Ito's "Uzumaki"
Death Note
One-Punch Man

This wiki has been updated 16 times since it was first published in March of 2018. Whether you're an avid reader already or just a lover of anime who's interested in getting into the source material from which almost every hit series is derived, there'll be something for you to read on our list of the best manga books. We've included top titles in a handful of genres, from slice-of-life to action and horror, ranked here by story quality and artistic merit. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best manga book on Amazon.

10. Black Butler

9. Fullmetal Alchemist

8. Death Note

7. Komi Can't Communicate

6. One-Punch Man

5. Tokyo Ghoul

4. Attack On Titan

3. Junji Ito's "Uzumaki"

2. My Hero Academia

1. Vinland Saga

Editor's Notes

June 09, 2020:

As an avid reader myself, I don't need to imagine how subjectively awful some other otaku might find my selections, especially given my intent to keep it contemporary, with the assumption that the likes of Osamu Tezuka and Shigeru Mizuki are already on serious readers' bookshelves. There were a few undeniably necessary additions this time around, however, as well as some niche titles that were sent packing.

Wandering Son, for example, while a beautiful story about LGBTQ youth, could be painfully slow. For a very different take on school life, we turned to Komi Can't Communicate, whose main character could be interpreted as being on the autism/Asperger's spectrum given her reluctance to speak. We also added Vinland Saga, which might be one of the most engrossing shonen titles since Berserk, with a sprawling narrative and a similarly stoic yet powerful protagonist. It's exploration of the father/son dynamic and its thematic roots in an old Buddhist revenge story grant it a timelessness that translated well into its anime adaptation, which garnered a bunch of nominations and a win or two from Crunchyroll.


Daniel Imperiale
Last updated on June 12, 2020 by Daniel Imperiale

Daniel Imperiale holds a bachelor’s degree in writing, and proudly fled his graduate program in poetry to pursue a quiet life at a remote Alaskan fishery. After returning to the contiguous states, he took up a position as an editor and photographer of the prestigious geek culture magazine “Unwinnable” before turning his attention to the field of health and wellness. In recent years, he has worked extensively in film and music production, making him something of a know-it-all when it comes to camera equipment, musical instruments, recording devices, and other audio-visual hardware. Daniel’s recent obsessions include horology (making him a pro when it comes to all things timekeeping) and Uranium mining and enrichment (which hasn’t proven useful just yet).


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