The 10 Best Monoculars

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We spent 40 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Perfect for viewing wild animals up close, stargazing, or simply bringing distant objects into clear view, these monoculars offer high quality optics in a compact and exceedingly portable package. They are available in a range of capabilities and budget options to suit casual wildlife enthusiasts through to die-hard explorers. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best monocular on Amazon.

10. Gosky Prism 12X50

9. Orion Zoom 8439

8. Firefield 5x50 Nightfall 2

7. Vortex Optics Solo R/T

6. Nikon High Grade 5x15

5. Wingspan Optics Outdoorsman

4. Carl Zeiss Optical T 10x25

3. Bestguarder 6x50mm HD Digital Night Vision

2. Bushnell Legend

1. Leica 8x20 Monovid

Taking The Long View: Distance Optics

The earliest functional telescopes were designed by Dutch spectacle makers in the first years of the 17th Century.

The earliest functional telescopes were designed by Dutch spectacle makers in the first years of the 17th Century. In the year 1609, Italian astronomer (and mathematician and philosopher and scientist writ large), Galileo Galilei designed an improved version of those first refracting telescopes. He pointed it skyward, becoming the first person known to have beheld a celestial object in a manner refined beyond the vision of the naked eye.

From those rudimentary optical devices have descended everything from the observatory to the Hubble Space Telescope, to the pair of binoculars tucked into the backpack of the hiker. And of course something else was born, too: the field of modern astronomy and a better understanding of the entire universe.

Today, there are many reasons for why a person might want to extend his or her vision out across a great distance. With the right optical hardware, one can enjoy a better view of a sporting event, concert, or a parade. Enhanced long distance vision is important for bird watching and other nature activities, or for hunting, too. In a tactical situation, such as a police stakeout or combat scenario, the better one can see from farther away, the safer they and the team remain and the better they can control the unfolding events.

Long distance viewing can also be important for various professional applications, such as surveying land prior to development, or in studying city streets or highways before an improvement or repair project. And of course the stargazer needs good optics to best enjoy the celestial bodies above.

Choosing the right device for your long distance viewing needs might not involve considering a massive astrographic telescope, but there are still a few considerations to keep in mind.

Why Monoculars Are Often Better Than Binoculars

If there is one primary reason why a monocular is often a better choice than a pair of binoculars, it is weight. By the very nature of their design, a pair of binoculars will usually weigh twice as much as a monocular with equivalent magnification power. If you're assembling a kit for use in a tactical situation or you are a trekker or climber carrying your gear over long distances, weight matters.

This can be of critical importance in combat or emergency situations.

While many people prefer the stereo vision afforded by binoculars, which recreates the way the human eyes see together, when you are trying to view a distinct object or a limited area without much depth, the monocular's flatter view can help you isolate the image more easily.

Because binoculars usually allow focusing adjustments for both eyes, with a center knob controlling both sets of optics and one side of the unit featuring another ring for fine tuning (most people have slightly different vision quality in each eye), they can provide a sharp view indeed. But that also means more effort required to achieve this sharp view, and it means more potential for improperly focused optics that can cause frustration, eye strain, and that can hamper your distance vision instead of helping it.

Monoculars also offer enhanced potential for situational awareness, as you can maintain your view of the long range object or area in question yet open the other eye for a quick review of the space closer to your person. This can be of critical importance in combat or emergency situations.

Choosing The Right Monocular For You

The first thing to note when considering which monocular you will buy is magnification power. But consider the fact that stronger is not always better. The more powerful a monocular's magnification power, the harder it will be to keep it steady and in focus. If you are hoping to get a better view of objects that aren't that far away, or if you value a wider field of vision over greater range of vision, than look for a monocular with midrange magnification over one with extreme power.

The more powerful a monocular's magnification power, the harder it will be to keep it steady and in focus.

Choosing a monocular that has a zoom feature can mitigate the issue of too much power, but with zooming in and out comes even more difficulty in achieving perfect focus, so know the give and take a zoom option offers you.

Next consider the time of day during which you will use your monocular. Many monoculars have amazing light gathering capabilities and work well even in darkness. Still others have actual night vision capabilities, sending out their own infrared light that can you can detect thanks to their specialized lenses. A night vision monocular is a great idea for many nature scientists or for use in tactical situations. However, most monocular that work well at night have optics that are objectively inferior in daylight. If you are primarily going to use your optical gear during the day, then you have many more options for a good monocular.

Ultimately, choosing the right monocular may well come down to its physical size and weight. If you are a hiker who regularly carries large loads of gear on your back, then every ounce matters. Opt for a smaller monocular and enjoy the view it affords you, even if other larger models have better magnification. If you are unconcerned with gear weight, then by all means choose an option large enough to be used as a spotting scope while hunting or as a compact telescope for viewing the firmament.

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Daniel Imperiale
Last updated on October 24, 2018 by Daniel Imperiale

Daniel Imperiale holds a bachelor’s degree in writing, and proudly fled his graduate program in poetry to pursue a quiet life at a remote Alaskan fishery. After returning to the contiguous states, he took up a position as an editor and photographer of the prestigious geek culture magazine “Unwinnable” before turning his attention to the field of health and wellness. In recent years, he has worked extensively in film and music production, making him something of a know-it-all when it comes to camera equipment, musical instruments, recording devices, and other audio-visual hardware. Daniel’s recent obsessions include horology (making him a pro when it comes to all things timekeeping) and Uranium mining and enrichment (which hasn’t proven useful just yet).


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