The 10 Best Neuroscience Textbooks

video play icon 10 Best Neuroscience Textbooks
Behavioral Neuroscience
The Principles of Neural Science
The Student's Guide to Cognitiv...

This wiki has been updated 17 times since it was first published in July of 2018. Anyone looking to pursue a career plumbing the depths of the human psyche should start with one of these neuroscience textbooks. Filled with useful illustrations, handy vocabulary lists, and up-to-date information, they provide an in-depth look at the way our brains function. Everything from basic biology to the roles played by genes and chemicals gets put under the microscope. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best neuroscience textbook on Amazon.

10. The Pathophysiology of Behavior and Mental Illness

9. The Student's Guide to Cognitive Neuroscience

8. Behavioral Neuroscience

7. Foundations of Behavioral Neuroscience

6. Fundamentals for Rehabilitation

5. The Biology of the Mind

4. Neuroscience: 6th Edition

3. Exploring the Brain

2. Netter's Atlas

1. The Principles of Neural Science

A Brief History Of Neuroscience

Still, they considered our grey matter to be of minor importance.

The question of where consciousness comes from has engaged great thinkers in debate since antiquity. The Greek philosopher and scientist Aristotle, along with many Egyptians, believed that the heart was the source of our consciousness, memory, intelligence, and imagination. In the Book of the Dead, a funerary text consisting of magic spells intended to help the deceased navigate the underworld, priests recommended carefully preserving the heart of a mummy. The brain, however, didn't get the same star treatment — the texts endorsed scooping it out and throwing it away.

That's not to say that Egyptians weren't studying the brain and how our nervous system works. Manuscripts dating back to 1700 B.C.E. indicate that ancient physicians were aware of multiple types of brain injuries and even had treatment recommendations for them. Still, they considered our grey matter to be of minor importance.

The idea that the heart was the seat of consciousness prevailed until Greek physician Hippocrates made the deduction that since our eyes, mouth, nose, and ears are near the brain, it must have something to do with how we perceive the world around us. Further progress was made when a Roman physician named Galen realized that his gladiator patients lost their mental faculties after suffering injuries that damaged their brains.

Over the next few hundred years, various physicians, chemists, surgeons, and philosophers would continue to chip away at our ignorance regarding neuroscience. Influential scholars like Maimonides, Avicenna, Avenzoar, and many others in the Medieval Muslim world described medical problems that had to do with the brain, while luminaries like Rene Descartes made further contributions to the field during the Renaissance in Europe.

The discipline received a push in the right direction in 1780 thanks to Luigi Galvani. One day, Galvani was experimenting with static electricity by rubbing skin from a dead frog. When a charged metal scalpel touched the frog's exposed sciatic nerve, its leg jumped as though it was alive. After that, people began to realize that electricity might play a role in how our bodies work.

Neuroscience was fast-tracked as pioneering research emerged over the following centuries. Thanks to parallel advances in molecular biology and electrophysiology, researchers were better able to study many aspects of the nervous system, like how it's structured, operates, changes, and malfunctions.

These days, our understanding is growing at a remarkable rate, but scientists acknowledge that formidable challenges lay ahead. Within the next 100 years, one can only imagine what we’ll know.

What Should You Expect From A Neuroscience Textbook?

Neuroscience is a multidisciplinary branch of biology that incorporates everything from anatomy and psychology to cytology, so naturally, textbooks can vary from one another quite a bit. For instance, if you’re looking to learn about mental disorders, you might benefit from a volume with a focus on psychiatry. Students and autodidacts who need to gain a broad understanding of the discipline will requite gentle introductions into the field, while others might want texts that focus on examples from animals and humans.

If you’re just breaking into neuroscience, the right volume can enlighten you on complex structures, vital vocabulary, famous experiments, and much more.

Regardless of the type of book you end up choosing, be sure to opt for the most updated version available. On top of that, you should be willing to spend a substantial amount of time staying abreast of breaking news in the field. Neuroscience is a rapidly advancing discipline, with the pace of discoveries often outstripping what gets printed in a textbook. Many researchers will tell you that they rely on peer-reviewed publications just as much as traditional textbooks.  

Now, that’s not to say that a textbook cannot still provide you with invaluable information. If you’re just breaking into neuroscience, the right volume can enlighten you on complex structures, vital vocabulary, famous experiments, and much more. You can expect an introductory tome to explain everything from the basic anatomy of the brain and what synapses are to how we develop certain behaviors.

Neuroscience is a subject that requires copious visuals to enhance understanding, so choose a text with an abundance of graphs, photos, illustrations, diagrams, and reconstructions. Additionally, a thorough book will incorporate research papers, real-life case studies, and online resources to round it out.

Just like with any other textbook, authors should be deploying useful pedagogical features to help students learn. Things like chapter summaries, bolded vocabulary, extensive indexes, and thoughtful questions go a long way in helping readers understand the material.  

Open Up Your Mind

If you're a student who's toying with the idea of studying neuroscience, know that an entirely new world is about to open up to you, should you chose to move forward with it. It's a fascinating branch of study that requires practitioners to plumb the depths of the mind and question reality as they know it. If you choose to be a researcher, you'll likely end up working on some truly compelling studies.

So, if you happen to be great with numbers and have a logical way of thinking about things, don't attribute it to just one hardworking portion of your grey matter.

For example, you've probably heard that creative people are right-brained, while being left-brained is a hallmark of analytical types and math lovers. The idea is that depending on your personality type, one half of your brain works harder than the other. While the evidence for this theory has always been pretty weak, researchers put it to bed by scanning the brains of one thousand people. They directed each participant to relax and think about nothing in particular for five to ten minutes. After, they analyzed their resting brain states and looked for evidence that more activity occurred in either the right or left side.

The results? No patterns were found that indicated that one network was more strongly connected in certain people. While some functions are biased toward one hemisphere of the brain, like language processing is towards the left, there didn't seem to be any tangible connection to our personalities.

So, if you happen to be great with numbers and have a logical way of thinking about things, don't attribute it to just one hardworking portion of your grey matter. You're also not doomed to never be a painter or musician, either. Your entire brain is responsible for your traits and functions, with the left and right sides working together, so there's no need to talk about creativity and logic as though they're mutually exclusive. Thankfully, it's entirely possible to have both skills in spades.

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Quincy Miller
Last updated on July 17, 2018 by Quincy Miller

After getting his bachelor’s from the University of Texas, Quincy Miller moved out to Los Angeles, where he soon found work as a copywriter and researcher, specializing in health and wellness topics for a major online media brand. Quincy is also knowledgeable about home improvement, as he’s had extensive experience with everything from insulation to power tools to emergency room trips, sometimes in that order. Sharing a home with three dogs and a couple of cats has forced Quincy to learn as much as he can about pet supplies, animal nutrition and, most importantly, the best ways to tackle the mountains of fur that accumulate in every corner of your home.


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