The 10 Best Psychotherapy Training Books

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Diagnostic And Statistical Manu...
Co-Creating Change
Deliberate Practice

This wiki has been updated 12 times since it was first published in July of 2018. Whether you're a student of psychotherapy or an experienced analyst looking to brush up on the latest techniques and theories, our selection of training books offers a variety of approaches and styles, so there's sure to be something to suit anybody's preferred methodology. We've ranked them here by their thoroughness, writing quality, and potential for practical use. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best psychotherapy training book on Amazon.

10. Co-Creating Change

9. Healing The Fragmented Selves Of Trauma Survivors

8. Deliberate Practice

7. DBT Skills Training Manual

6. Internal Family Systems Therapy

5. Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders

4. Helping Skills

3. Training For Change

2. Narrative Therapy

1. The Cycle Of Excellence

Editor's Notes

June 10, 2020:

Looking over the selections from our last ranking, a number of the included books, while comprehensive and useful to a point, were somewhat outdated, and we wanted this iteration to include texts that were more reflective of current trends in psychoanalysis and society at large. That's why we sent off titles like 1998's Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in favor of something like 2019's Training For Change, which emphasizes the importance of understanding behavioral patterns from various cultures. That way, a clinician can avoid a misdiagnosis that results from cultural ignorance.

We also saw a few too many titles geared specifically toward dynamic approaches, like Treating Affect Phobia, and decided to reduce that group down to its most recent and most effective text in Jon Frederickson's Co-Creating Change, which can be immensely helpful when dealing with walled-off patients. Finally, we thought it would be appropriate to include the latest Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders, as it's a standard reference used in both educational and practical settings that you'll see on every psychiatrist's bookshelf, even if it isn't exactly a page-turner.


Daniel Imperiale
Last updated on June 13, 2020 by Daniel Imperiale

Daniel Imperiale holds a bachelor’s degree in writing, and proudly fled his graduate program in poetry to pursue a quiet life at a remote Alaskan fishery. After returning to the contiguous states, he took up a position as an editor and photographer of the prestigious geek culture magazine “Unwinnable” before turning his attention to the field of health and wellness. In recent years, he has worked extensively in film and music production, making him something of a know-it-all when it comes to camera equipment, musical instruments, recording devices, and other audio-visual hardware. Daniel’s recent obsessions include horology (making him a pro when it comes to all things timekeeping) and Uranium mining and enrichment (which hasn’t proven useful just yet).


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