The 10 Best Single Serve Coffee Makers

Updated June 15, 2018 by Quincy Miller

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We spent 47 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top options for this wiki. Why brew a whole pot of joe and waste all those grounds when you only want one cup? These single-serve coffee makers deliver a delicious brew one mug at a time, which is great for individuals and small households. They also work quickly enough to function well in an office break room or even at a party, allowing people to enjoy different brands or flavors on demand. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best single serve coffee maker on Amazon.

10. Keurig K575

9. Mixpresso Single

8. Hamilton Beach 49981A

7. Hamilton Beach Brewer

6. Cuisinart Coffee-On-Demand

5. Presto MyJo

4. Nespresso VertuoLine Evoluo

3. Chulux 10-Ounce

2. Aicok Quick Brew

1. AdirChef Grab N' Go

Benefits Of Single Serve Coffee Makers

Convenience is one of the main reasons most consumers and offices first switch to single serve machines. One can make fresh, hot coffee in less than a minute, without having to deal with filters or grounds. Many models also contain a large reservoir, so there often isn't need to add water to a machine before every brew. Unlike with a traditional drip machine, one isn't left with a large carafe that needs to be cleaned out once the coffee is finished. Instead, single serve machines brew coffee directly into the serving cup. Being able to brew individual cups of hot beverages can be great for dinner parties, too. Instead of serving all of your guests the exact same thing, each guest can choose their beverage of choice.

Using a single serve coffee machine results in significantly less wasted coffee every day, as well. No matter whether we live alone, with friends, or with family, it is almost inevitable that we will make more coffee than we need. With a standard machine, it is not uncommon to pour a cup or two of coffee down the drain with each pot. Single serve coffee makers eliminate that waste. Each individual can make a cup for themselves, whenever they want it. There is no need to brew a large pot in the hopes that there will be enough for everybody, while at the same time hoping that everybody will actually drink a cup and you won't be left with half of a pot to dump out.

It isn't just home consumers that can benefit from a single cup coffee makers, but businesses, too. Nearly every office has that one coworker who always takes that last cup of coffee, but never makes a new pot or washes out the old one. This can quickly cause feelings of animosity in other workers. There is also the problem of having regular and decaf drinkers. Before the advent of the single serve coffee maker, offices would need to have two machines, one for decaf and one for regular. Single serve machines also allow businesses to provide their customers with fresh coffee or tea at a moment's notice.

A Few Things To Consider When Choosing Your Single Serve Coffee Machine

Not all single serve coffee makers are created equal. You can choose from high-end models that are capable of making cappuccinos and espressos that can rival those from your favorite coffee chain, all the way down to basic models that do nothing more than make a single cup of drip style coffee. No matter which type you choose, there are a few features that you may want to consider before making your choice.

If your budget allows, it is always best to choose a model that features adjustable brew strength settings. These allow you to customize the cup of coffee to match your taste. Generally, single cup coffee makers achieve different strengths by altering the brew time. When selecting the strong brew setting on a machine, it will increase the brewing time so that the water spends more time in contact with the coffee grounds.

An adjustable brew size is also a nice feature to have. On lazy weekend mornings, you may only want to make enough coffee to fit into the standard 8 or 10 ounce home mug, while on workdays, you may want to make enough coffee to fill your 12 or 16 ounce travel mug. A model with an adjustable brew size gives you the freedom to do just that.

Ideally, you should also choose a model with an adjustable temperature range, as brew temperature can have a serious impact on the end result. If the water is too hot, it can over extract the flavor from the grounds, resulting in a bitter taste. Water that is too cold can result in a weak, watered down cup of coffee. Having a machine with an adjustable temperature range gives you one more tool at your disposal to customize your java.

The size of the reservoir can play a huge role in how convenient you find a particular model to be. Some models have a large reservoir that can make 10 or more cups of coffee before being refilled. Other models may require you to fill them before brewing each cup. The trade-off here is that models with large reservoirs will require more counter space.

K-cups Versus Coffee Pods

The terms coffee pod and K-cup are often used interchangeably by the uninitiated, but they actually refer to two very different products. The majority of consumers with a single serve coffee machine use K-cups. These are small plastic cups that contain a paper filter and coffee grounds. They are completely air-tight and sealed with a combination foil and plastic lid. During brewing, the machine pierces the lid and the bottom of the cup so that pressurized hot water can pass through it. Most people appreciate the K-cup for its convenience. Many machines automatically move the used cup into a receptacle bin, but even those that require manual removal won't get the users hands dirty or wet, as the exterior of the cup will be completely dry.

Critics of the K-cup often lambast it for not being easily recyclable, though when put into perspective, it can be said that they make up for the waste in water conservation. Either way, the controversy has prompted Keurig, the main manufacturer and license distributor, to make a recyclable version, though this too may have its failings.

Coffee pods are packaged ground coffee beans that come in a filter bag. This bag is placed directly into the brewing chamber of a single serve pod machine. Hot water is then either dripped over the pod or forced through it by pressure. Pods are slightly less convenient as they require the user to open the chamber and remove a damp filter bag. The brewing chamber of pod machines also needs to be cleaned more often. The upside is that they are often fully biodegradable, making them more eco-friendly.


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Last updated on June 15, 2018 by Quincy Miller

Quincy is a writer who was born in Texas, but moved to Los Angeles to pursue his life-long dream of someday writing a second page to one of his screenplays.


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