Updated June 12, 2020 by Jeff Newburgh

The 10 Best Therapy Balls

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This wiki has been updated 10 times since it was first published in March of 2018. Whether you suffer from arthritis or tend to overdo it during your exercise sessions, one of these therapy balls can revitalize your body and provide a speedy post-workout recovery. Digging into the affected areas, many of our options provide a deep massage that helps to release pressure points, improve blood circulation, and build up strength in both the muscles and tendons. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best therapy ball on Amazon.

10. Hyperice Hypersphere

9. Rollga Activator

8. Milliard Physio Rolls

7. Friendly Swede Strength Squeezers

6. SpoiledHippo Massage

5. 4Kor Fitness Ultimate

4. TriggerPoint Massage

3. Recoup Fitness Cryosphere

2. Kieba Lacrosse

1. UrbnFit Exercise

Special Honors

Sidekick Sidekick develops and sells all-encompassing exercise therapy tools designed to target the shoulders, back, and legs. The company markets a variety of muscle scrapers and vibration recovery tools to assist with myofascial release and trigger point treatments. One of its most popular products is the Fuse Vibration therapy device. Equipped with a rechargeable lithium-ion battery, the device offers several operation modes and runs continuously for up to one hour. Many website purchases also include access to the exclusive Sidekick University, a library of over 40 videos and guided classes to help you recover and improve your mobility. sidekicktool.com

Editor's Notes

June 08, 2020:

When it comes to exercise, individuals benefit from distinct workout regimens that are specifically tailored to their own body types and stamina levels. You are your best advocate when determining the types of workouts that make you feel good. However, in situations where such workouts result in more pain to your joints and muscles than you'd like, our list of therapy balls can provide the tools needed to revitalize your body from head to toe.

You may already use a traditional exercise ball or perhaps you prefer the high-impact rigors of a treadmill or lifting weights to get in shape. Whatever fitness plan you follow, you'll need something to assist with your pre- and post-workout recovery to minimize the occurrence of injury, especially if you're the type who tends to overdo it.

We've included options like the URBNFit Exercise and Kieba Lacrosse, the former of which is well-suited for use in a home gym in combination with other heavy equipment and ideal for targeting the abdominal and lower back muscles, while the latter uses your own weight and force of gravity to relieve muscle tension.

Good for post-workout soreness, the Recoup Fitness Cryosphere can be stored in the freezer and used to massage the biceps, shoulders, neck, elbows, and feet.

Increasing blood and oxygen circulation within the body is important when it comes to post-workout recovery and improving mobility, making the multilayered construction and variable density of the TriggerPoint Massage valuable features for such a task.

The Friendly Swede Strength Squeezers are testament to the fact that therapeutic forms of exercise don't have to be all-encompassing, meaning they don't have to target every part of the body. These egg-shaped rubber balls are designed to assist with arthritis and relieve stress in the hands, forearms, and wrists. They can also be useful for reducing anxiety or helping kids to maintain their focus.

We've also included the Milliard Physio Rolls, which, thanks to their dipped saddles, can be used for the physical conditioning of both people and canines.

The Rollga Activator offers the benefit of several distinct surfaces, all dedicated to relieving physical tension and targeting pressure points.

Despite a rather high price point, we've included the Hyperice Hypersphere due to its use of high-intensity vibration to quickly release trigger points. For this particular model, a doctor should be consulted before deciding to use it as a physical rehabilitation tool.


Jeff Newburgh
Last updated on June 12, 2020 by Jeff Newburgh

Jeff is a dedicated writer and communications professional from San Francisco with a bachelor of arts in anthropology from UC Berkeley. He began his career in computer consulting and later branched out into customer service. Jeff focuses on making complex topics easy to understand. With over 10 years' experience in research, his relentless curiosity fuels a love of writing and learning how things work, and has helped to build expertise in categories such as heavy-duty power tools and computer equipment. Jeff's passion for animals affords him a strong understanding of pet products, including dog houses, beds, and grain-free foods. When he's not writing, he prefers spending time with his family and three dogs, while kicking back and relaxing with a nice glass of red wine.


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