Updated January 28, 2021 by Brett Dvoretz

The 9 Best Thermostat Locks

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This wiki has been updated 10 times since it was first published in May of 2019. If you’ve got kids who never saw a button they didn't want to push or employees who prefer a subzero environment, an unprotected thermostat can lead to sky-high utility bills. Rather than watching it like a hawk, consider one of these locks instead. They provide an easy way to stop unauthorized access to temperature controls, and come in a host of sizes and styles to suit every need. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki.

1. StatGuardPlus Changeable

2. Elago ENET Secure

3. Bramec Corporation Sentinel 13002

Editor's Notes

January 26, 2021:

When choosing a thermostat, you should consider not just style, level of security, and size, but also how easy it will be for you to install. If you don't mind disconnecting wires and removing your thermostat from the wall, you can choose a model with a baseplate, like the Bramec Corporation Sentinel 13002, TayMac ZTC300, and Emerson G10. These will generally offer a slightly higher level of security, especially the Sentinel 13002, which is crafted from steel. Those who are intimidated by electrical wiring, or simply don't want to deal with the hassle, can look to options like the Honeywell Medium, Honeywell CG512A, and Safety Technology International 9110, which can be placed right over existing installations.

May 15, 2019:

While most thermostat guards are similar in design, we saw an opportunity to provide subtly different models to suit varied tastes and sizes. One thing each selection has in common, though, is that they are all outfitted with plenty of vents to allow airflow to reach your temperature controls. This ensures they won't interfere with how they work. We included options for residential and commercial use, so school administrators, hotel staff, office managers, and homeowners should all find something to suit their needs.

The StatGuardPlus Changeable made our number one pick for two main reasons outside of its durable construction. One, it doesn't require keys to be secured, which is a huge advantage over other models, as keys are easily lost, and limited in who can carry them. It also uses a hinged door, which seems inconsequential unless you frequently need to get to the thermostat to change it. Taking off an entire cover is not only annoying, but it increases the chance you might accidentally drop and damage it.

The Elago Secure is another quality option that we felt deserved a high ranking for its thoughtful design. Many people are turning to smart thermostats, with Nest being one of the most popular. It only made sense to ensure Nest owners had the means to cover their devices. Although Nest has a control lock feature, you may still want to give someone else control who doesn't have access to the app or your phone, or maybe you'd just like to keep wandering fingers from touching it.

Each of the Honeywell units on this list fit more than just Honeywell brand thermostats, making them even more versatile. They're treated to resist chemicals and UV light, which is great if they'll be exposed to either. This also makes cleaning them worry-free.

Finally, those who require something nigh-indestructible should look to the Bramec Corporation Sentinel. It should keep anyone looking to mess with your thermostat completely at bay, making it especially good for exposed and industrial areas.

4. TayMac ZTC300

5. Honeywell Medium

6. Honeywell CG512A

7. Emerson G10

8. Braeburn 5970

9. Safety Technology International 9110


Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on January 28, 2021 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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