The 9 Best Thunderbolt to HDMI Adapters

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 8 times since it was first published in February of 2018. The Thunderbolt connection protocol transmits data significantly faster than USB, so its high bandwidth makes it great for sending video feeds to the newest monitors and TVs. Versions 1 & 2 use a mini DisplayPort, while the 3rd and fastest iteration takes advantage of the newest USB-C connector. One of these adapters can add HDMI capability to your tablet, 2-in-1, or smartphone quickly and easily. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best thunderbolt to hdmi adapter on Amazon.

9. CableCreation 90 Degree

8. Gofanco Adapter

7. Lention Hub

6. Cable Matters

5. CalDigit Mini Dock

4. ChoeTech 1201BK

3. BeEasy Hub

2. Sabrent TH-W3H2

1. Uni USB-C

Editor's Notes

October 20, 2019:

Depending on what kind of connectivity you need in addition to an HDMI connector, there are quite a few options to choose from here. The Uni is the simplest and doesn't actually require Thunderbolt 3 connectivity, but only a USB-C port with video capability. While the Sabrent is pretty costly, it is a big step up, because it uses the HDMI 2.0 standard and can accommodate 2 4k monitors at 60 hertz, something that standard USB-C currently cannot do. The BeEasy and Lention are both capable USB-C hubs with 4K output, but like many others, they only utilize HDMI 1.4 and are therefore limited to 30 hertz. Speaking of hubs, the CalDigit is an especially powerful docking station that has all the capabilities of a high-end dock minus the Power Delivery passthrough.

We've also included a few somewhat specialty items that can come in handy for many users. ChoeTech and CableCreation both make highly capable HDMI cables that streamline the connection process. And the Gofanco and Cable Matters options use the older mini DisplayPort connector used by Thunderbolt 1 and 2, which you'll need if you're using an older MacBook or Microsoft Surface.


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on October 26, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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