Updated August 08, 2020 by Melissa Harr

The 9 Best Vinyl Cutters

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 9 times since it was first published in February of 2018. Whether you enjoy making personalized gifts for family and friends or are looking to start a profitable business, choosing the right vinyl cutter can make all the difference. We've included a variety of high-quality choices for large projects that won't break the bank, as well as some more traditional desktop models for everyday crafts, like mugs, T-shirts, and scrapbooks. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best vinyl cutter on Amazon.

9. Gemini by Crafter's Companion

8. Silhouette Portrait 2

7. Brother ScanNCut2

6. Cricut Explore Air 2

5. Sizzix Tim Holtz Vagabond 2

4. USCutter MH Bundle

3. Silhouette Cameo 4

2. USCutter Titan 2

1. Cricut Maker

Special Honors

Klic-N-Kut Zing Orbit It's a little large and pricey for home use, but for professionals who demand a mix of quality and usability — and who have the budget — the Klic-N-Kut Zing Orbit is one to consider. It gives you both USB and Wi-Fi connectivity along with a robust 1,000 grams of cutting force. knkusa.com

Graphtec FC9000 Series A roll-fed cutting plotter, the Graphtec FC9000 Series is available in four widths, including a large 64-inch version. You can count on it to handle a wide range of materials both thick and thin, and without any hassles, thanks to the Datalink Barcode System that allows you to process multiple jobs without production errors. graphtecamerica.com

Editor's Notes

August 06, 2020:

It's no secret that for most users, vinyl cutters from Cricut and Silhouette still come out on top. In fact, at this time, it remains hard to beat the Cricut Maker. Despite being replete with features, it's simple enough to use, and like most cutting machines, it works with a range of materials, including fabric, paper, leather, and even balsa wood. Keep in mind that as with most similar machines, you may need to invest in a range of blades, as some are better suited to certain purposes and materials than others. As for Silhouette, we've kept the Silhouette Portrait 2 and added the Silhouette Cameo 4, which replaces the Cameo 3. This version has an increased downforce and a second-generation auto blade with a handy single-tap reset function.

As for feature-light, less expensive machines, the Sizzix Tim Holtz Vagabond 2 remains one to consider. It, like the Gemini by Crafter's Companion, is a die-cutting machine that doesn't require you to use any design software. Both are relatively portable, so if you have a crafting circle or class to go to, you could bring them along.

Finally, we updated the Brother ScanNCut to the current newest version. You can use it with or without a computer thanks to the built-in touchscreen, but either way, expect there to be something of a learning curve.

May 06, 2019:

There are two stand-out names for at-home vinyl cutters, Cricut and Silhouette, and it's little surprise that they remain top choices for a range of crafters. As to the former, the Maker and the Explore Air 2 are options to look at, as they're both robust machines that are really only limited by your time and creativity. The Explore Air 2 does require you to have a paid subscription and internet connection to access many of the design features, however, which some users find frustrating. Regarding Silhouette, the Portrait 2 and Cameo 3 are still ones to beat thanks to a blend of usability and versatility. Turning to competing models, the Titan 2 and MH from USCutter are fine options for those who'll be using their machines in professional settings, but as you might expect, they're quite a bit more expensive. We also kept the Brother ScanNCut, even though the company's DX model is more feature heavy. It would seem that currently, the DX has some quirks that make using it something of a hassle, which means it may not be ready for prime time.


Melissa Harr
Last updated on August 08, 2020 by Melissa Harr

Melissa Harr is a language-obsessed writer from Chicagoland who holds both a bachelor of arts and master of arts in English. Although she began as a TEFL teacher, earning several teaching certificates and working in both Russia and Vietnam, she moved into freelance writing to satisfy her passion for the written word. She has published full-length courses and books in the realm of arts & crafts and DIY; in fact, most of her non-working time is spent knitting, cleaning, or committing acts of home improvement. Along with an extensive knowledge of tools, home goods, and crafts and organizational supplies, she has ample experience (okay, an obsession) with travel gear, luggage, and the electronics that make modern life more convenient.


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