The 10 Best Windproof Lighters

Updated April 17, 2018 by Quincy Miller

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We spent 44 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. Whether you are camping, hiking or having a backyard barbecue, don't let the pesky elements prevent you from starting a fire or lighting up the grill. Using a variety of technologies, from radiant heat to good old-fashioned windbreaks, one of these windproof lighters will let you get your flame on in virtually any circumstances. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best windproof lighter on Amazon.

10. SaberLight Revolutionary

It's probably called the SaberLight Revolutionary because it has dual plasma beams, which is a radical new way of creating fire. In fact, the torches get even hotter than regular flames, so they'll come in handy if you ever need super-fire for some reason.
  • can be used in the rain
  • long-lasting charge
  • not the most durable option
Brand Saberlight
Model pending
Weight 6.4 ounces
Rating 4.7 / 5.0

9. Dreambay EDC 2-pack

Hardened survivalists should slip one of the Dreambay EDC 2-pack into their bug-out bag, while the other one can be attached to a belt loop or key chain. If your life depends on your ability to get a fire going, you'll be hard-pressed to find a more reliable option.
  • ship with 6 flints and a spare wick
  • both are small and lightweight
  • tend to rust easily
Brand Dreambay
Model pending
Weight 2.6 ounces
Rating 3.6 / 5.0

8. Vertigo Cyclone

The clear fuel tank on the Vertigo Cyclone lets you always stay abreast of how much butane you have left, so you're never in for a nasty surprise when you need a flame. Plus, it kind of looks like a miniature lightsaber, so you'll feel like a Jedi every time you spark up.
  • doesn't use much gas
  • three flames for versatile power
  • gets pretty hot if used continuously
Brand VertiGo
Model CYCLONE
Weight 1.6 ounces
Rating 3.6 / 5.0

7. ShinySiblings Black Dragon

Besides having an awesome name, the ShinySiblings Black Dragon is environmentally-friendly, since it's rechargeable instead of using butane or other fluids. The included battery should be good for up to 500 discharge and recharging cycles.
  • comes with attractive gift box
  • helpful for fusing paracord
  • lid doesn't open fully
Brand SHINYSIBLINGS
Model pending
Weight 7.2 ounces
Rating 3.6 / 5.0

6. X Bull Electronic

All it takes is the press of a button and the X Bull Electronic will unleash a steady arc that's more than powerful enough to spark up some tinder. The flame is a little narrow, though, so you'll need to light dry grass or cotton balls first, rather than the wood itself.
  • won't ignite while charging
  • works well on fireworks
  • not suitable for use on cigars
Brand X BULL
Model pending
Weight 7.2 ounces
Rating 4.0 / 5.0

5. Saberlight Extended

It looks like a miniature taser, but the Saberlight Extended creates a small, blistering spark that the wind can't snuff out. It's TSA-approved as well, so you can stash it in your carry-on, ensuring that you'll be able to light up the instant you step off the plane.
  • great for lighting candles
  • up to 300 uses per charge
  • can be turned on accidentally
Brand Saberlight
Model pending
Weight 8 ounces
Rating 4.3 / 5.0

4. MegaDeal Jet Torch

The MegaDeal Jet Torch comes with four different units, so you'll always have one handy when you need it and you can stash the rest in your car, RV, or anywhere else. They're also budget-friendly, so if you lose one or three, replacing them won't put you in the poorhouse.
  • shoot a consistent flame
  • comfy ergonomic grip
  • each fits nicely in pants pockets
Brand MegaDeal Jet Torch
Model pending
Weight pending
Rating 3.9 / 5.0

3. Saberlight Flex

Sometimes you need to start a fire in a hard-to-reach place, and if you don't want to accidentally burn your fingers (or your house down), there's the Saberlight Flex. It has a 6-inch neck that's fully flexible, so you can twist it to whatever angle you need at the time.
  • child safety switch
  • good for lighting grills
  • hook end for easy storage
Brand Saberlight
Model pending
Weight 8.2 ounces
Rating 4.9 / 5.0

2. HaloVa Rechargeable

The sleek zinc alloy body on the HaloVa Rechargeable will add a classy feel to your next camping trip or BBQ, or it will just make you look cool outside the club. You can charge it up with a basic USB cable, so you'll never be without a flame when you need one most.
  • easy to operate one-handed
  • charges in about an hour
  • it emits no odors
Brand HaloVa
Model pending
Weight 7.2 ounces
Rating 4.5 / 5.0

1. Zippo Custom Skull Flag

Made by one of the most recognizable names in lighters, the Zippo Custom Skull Flag will help you feel like a member of a renegade biker gang, even if you're just sneaking a cigarette outside your office. It's refillable, so it's more than capable of lasting a lifetime.
  • company will repair it for free
  • all-metal construction
  • patriotic artwork
Brand Zippo
Model pending
Weight pending
Rating 4.8 / 5.0

The Windproof Lighter: For Convenience And/Or Survival

There are few items out there which can at certain times seem like nothing more than a way to make a basic task simpler, and at other times may well be the fulcrum of a life or death situation. The windproof lighter falls into in this decidedly narrow category, straddling the boundary between convenience and necessity.

Whether you are simply getting a cigar lit in a matter of seconds despite the breeze blowing down the street or you are firing up the grill on a blustery afternoon, a good windproof lighter gets the heat where it needs to be. This is also true if you're trying to get a road flare lit during a storm or you are trying to get the tinder beneath a campfire caught so you can brave the icy night ahead while stranded in the wilderness.

Most windproof lighters are compact and lightweight and are priced to sell, too. There are some designed to be stylish, and there are some that are all about function over form. Choosing the right windproof lighter for you depends on your lifestyle, your hobbies, and your desire for preparation. This is a product category where, you'll be glad to know, budget is hardly a concern: most windproof lighters cost between ten and twenty dollars.

Choosing The Right Windproof Lighter

There are many types of lighter that fall under the umbrella heading of "windproof," and first, to be clear, no lighter is truly 100% windproof. A hurricane force blast of wind is going to extinguish that flame, so in fact these lighters should more accurately be thought of as highly wind-resistant. (Certain types of electric lighters offer the best wind resistance, but the heat they produce is harder to use to start fires, so this benefit is mitigated.)

For the cigarette smoker, an electric "plasma" lighter is an ideal choice. These lighters create a small arc of electric heat so hot it can almost instantly ignite the tip of a cigarette or small cigar, and they work well even in high winds, as there is no true flame to blow out.

For the cigar or pipe smoker, a "jet flame" torch lighter is a better choice, as they require a larger flame to ignite all the tobacco at once.

And for use lighting the charcoals of a grill or starting a campfire (or what might be a survival fire, given the situation), a double flame torch lighter fueled by refined butane is a great choice, especially if it's one with a cap that seals tightly, protecting its flame element when not in use.

Yet another category of windproof lighters uses the same approach as the cigarette lighter (now more commonly thought of as a DC power outlet) in your vehicle, relying on electricity to heat a small element much like a miniature burner of an electric stove. These are some of the safest windproof lighters, as there is no open flame of any type produced, but they are also very ineffective for anything but lighting cigarettes, smaller cigars, or perhaps the fuse of a bottle rocket on the 4th of July.

Thanks to the relatively low cost of most windproof lighters, there may be no need to choose just one type as your go-to heat source; the answer to which windproof lighter suits your needs best might be to reject choosing only one, and instead to keep one lighter on hand for firing up that cigar, and a different type in the glovebox or hiking pack for helping you weather the unexpected storm.

Windproof Lighter Use And Maintenance

A standard windproof jet flame type of lighter requires re-filling from a pressurized bottle of butane once its reservoir is empty. The refilling process is easy and takes only a few seconds. Once these lighters have a problem with their electric ignition system, though, there is usually no cost-effective way to fix them, and they must be discarded and replaced.

An average arc flame lighter requires charging via USB after an average of 200 uses; some last longer, some last less time. An advantage to this type of lighter is that their fuel source is readily abundant, but a disadvantage is that they lose their charge over time, while a butane lighter, for example, retains its fuel for months on end. Make sure to keep the area between the lighter's nodes clean and free of lint or other debris, as of course there's a fire hazard with a lighter.

The iconic Zippo lighter is the most basic item that falls into the windproof lighter category. They use regular cloth wicks and burn liquid fuel, and in fact it is their physical design, not their burner or fuel, that makes them wind resistant. The small holes bored into the windscreen frame around the wick allow wind to pass around the flame, which causes it to dance and flicker, but does not allow for direct exposure to a gust that could extinguish the flame.

These lighters look great and work well in dry conditions, but they require extensive maintenance, with the wick and flint requiring regular replacement and the re-fueling process being involved and occasionally messy.


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Last updated on April 17, 2018 by Quincy Miller

Quincy is a writer who was born in Texas, but moved to Los Angeles to pursue his life-long dream of someday writing a second page to one of his screenplays.


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