Updated April 26, 2020 by Gia Vescovi-Chiordi

The 10 Best Yoga DVDs

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 8 times since it was first published in April of 2018. Whether you're an experienced practitioner on a first-name basis with the instructors at your local studio or a novice who has never stepped into a class, anyone can benefit from having a yoga DVD or two at home. You can learn to bend yourself into new shapes in the privacy of your own living room, and you'll never be able to blame bad weather for skipping your session. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best yoga dvd on Amazon.

10. Power Flow

9. Stretch for Beginners and Beyond

8. Prenatal Vinyasa

7. Jillian Michaels Meltdown

6. Yoga for Seniors

5. Body Wisdom's For Beginners

4. Gaiam's Power Collection

3. Gentle Yoga

2. Gaiam's For Your Week

1. Yoga Boost

Special Honors

Yoga Journal Founded in 1975 by members of the California Yoga Teachers Association, Yoga Journal is the world’s leading website for information on yoga and its lifestyle. It provides access to thousands of images and articles on poses, meditation, and philosophy, as well as a database of poses, instructional videos, therapeutic applications, and more. You can sign up to receive a print or digital version of the Yoga Journal magazine, which offers expert advice, lifestyle tips, current trends, and masterclass lessons. yogajournal.com

Pocket Yoga App Pocket Yoga is an app that is best suited to newbies who are looking to dip a toe in the art but aren't ready to commit to an in-person class. You can choose practices based on your skill level and time constraints, or explore the comprehensive pose dictionary if you're struggling. Each class is meant to mimic a real studio, with an instructor to guide you and soothing music. The app does not require network connectivity and has AirPlay support. pocketyoga.com

Editor's Notes

April 23, 2020:

If you're looking to practice yoga at home, there are a host of ways to do it, whether you're live-streaming an online class, watching a YouTube video, or using an app. The nice thing about DVDs, however, other than the fact that they don't require wifi to use, is that they offer a consistent structure you can return to again and again as you master the routines.

People of all shapes, sizes, and creeds practice yoga, and so we wanted this list to reflect that diversity. That's why we added another option for seniors with Yoga for Seniors, which seeks to help adults over 70, while Gentle Yoga is best for ages 40 to 70. Yoga for Seniors works its way from level one to three, using a chair and gentle movements to get practitioners familiar with the poses before alternating between standing and sitting. The goal is to help seniors live fuller, more independent lives, as well as improve posture, strengthen joints, and prevent falls.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, those who want something more aggressive and tailored to a higher level of fitness will appreciate Jillian Michaels Meltdown, Power Flow, and Gaiam's Power Collection. Each of these is meant to be challenging and dynamic, but be aware that you will likely get left behind if you're a true beginner.

If you're looking for a middle ground, then selections like Body Wisdom's For Beginners and Yoga Boost are ideal. These two new additions were brought on today to cater to people who are not new to exercise, but new to yoga. Yoga Boost is especially helpful for those who usually avoid yoga because they feel out of their element or don't respond well to the spirituality and mindfulness you typically find in the practice. This DVD looks to deliver the benefits of yoga via clear instruction and straightforward routines.

Many of the selections on this list feature both long and short workouts to fit into a packed schedule, and Gaiam's For Your Week is actually tailored for busy people. You'll also find some of the videos on our list incorporate blocks and resistance bands, but happily explain how you can substitute household items to take their place if you don't want to buy any equipment.


Gia Vescovi-Chiordi
Last updated on April 26, 2020 by Gia Vescovi-Chiordi

Born in Arizona, Gia is a writer and autodidact who fled the heat of the desert for California, where she enjoys drinking beer, overanalyzing the minutiae of life, and channeling Rick Steves. After arriving in Los Angeles a decade ago, she quickly nabbed a copywriting job at a major clothing company and derived years of editing and proofreading experience from her tenure there, all while sharpening her skills further with myriad freelance projects. In her spare time, she teaches herself French and Italian, has earned an ESL teaching certificate, traveled extensively throughout Europe and the United States, and unashamedly devours television shows and books. The result of these pursuits is expertise in fashion, travel, beauty, literature, textbooks, and pop culture, in addition to whatever obsession consumes her next.


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