5 Organizations Protecting Nature in New York

While its largest city is a stunning monument to progress, it's important for the citizens of New York to take action and not let industry destroy the pristine natural areas of the state. These organizations work to protect recreational areas, wildlife preserves, and waterways not only for the health of animals and plants, but for the people who will live in this area for generations to come. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

5 New York Organizations Preserving Wildlife and Open Spaces

Name Location Conservation Efforts
Riverkeeper Ossining Works to stop polluters, inform the public, restore wildlife habitats, and safeguard drinking water resources by protecting the Hudson River and its tributaries
Catskill Center Arkville Maintains the Catskill Park and Forest Preserve with its Invasive Species Partnership, Streamwatch educational programs, conservation easements, and other initiatives aimed at increasing community involvement in preserving the local ecosystem
Mohonk Preserve New Paltz Monitors and maintains the local deer population, keeps track of peregrines and hawks, compiles climate data, and offers a wealth of summer camps and other offerings to get young people out into nature
Teatown Lake Reservation Ossining Nature preserve and educational center with hiking trails, the Wildflower Island refuge containing 280 species of plants, habitat management, phenology research, and programs to fight invasive species
Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy Delmar Eighteen public preserves for hiking, cross-country skiing, and other educational and recreational opportunities, as the group conserves land through acquisitions, easements, and partnerships with local farmers

Undamming the Hudson River with Riverkeeper

Endangered Species in New York

Environmental Stewardship at Mohonk Preserve

In Depth

For a state that contains Central Park, the Statue of Liberty National Monument, Times Square, and the Rockefeller Center, New York is home to a surprising number of natural areas. The Brooklyn Botanical Garden, Bronx Zoo, and millions of acres of protected wilderness all emphasize the importance that the region places on the outdoors. Add in almost two thousand miles of hiking and biking trails, and it becomes even more apparent that amidst the concrete jungle, there's still plenty of room for green. In no particular order, here are five organizations dedicated to protecting nature in New York.

At #1 is Riverkeeper, an organization with a mission to protect the environmental, recreational, and commercial integrity of the Hudson and its tributaries. Through their work, they also seek to safeguard the drinking water of nine million New Yorkers. Starting in 1966, the group stemmed from Hudson River fishermen whose catches reeked from oil spilled daily into the area. Members patrol the surface, inform the public, and go to court whenever it's necessary, in the attempt to eliminate illegal contamination.

Riverkeeper operates by holding polluters accountable and trying to making the Hudson safer and cleaner each year by providing clear data about the restoration process. The organization focuses on trying to fight threats to sanitary water, like destructive power plants, reckless development and decrepit infrastructure. They attempt to create solutions for improving wildlife habitat, fostering sustainable energy, and rallying thousands of volunteers to restore their local river fronts. A donation can go toward hosting an awareness party and continuing to remove waste from the area.

A donation can go toward hosting an awareness party and continuing to remove waste from the area.

For #2 we have the Catskill Center, a group dedicated to the improvement of the environment in that region. Since 1969, the organization has concentrated their work on protecting the seven hundred thousand acres of the Catskill Park and Forest Preserve. Their programs include a Regional Invasive Species Partnership, a science class that teaches fourth graders about the animals in the area, a Streamside Acquisition effort, and more. They believe in preserving nature trails, and informing visitors about the beautiful wilderness in a safe way.

The Catskill Center also functions as a land trust, which hopes to maintain the forest, give wildlife a home, and supply humans with a place of refuge. Much of New York City's water supply flows straight from the Catskills. The organization also focuses its efforts on stabilizing stream beds to help prevent the enormous expense of filtration. A monetary gift to the foundation helps to connect visitors and residents with the landscapes of the region, and preserve the surrounding environment.

At #3 on the list is the Mohonk Preserve. The organization's mission is to protect the Shawangunk Mountains region, and inspire people to care for, enjoy, and explore their natural world. Managing over 8,000 acres of mountain ridges, forests, fields, streams, and ponds, the preserve partners with volunteers and members to accomplish their goals. They seek to make the area a beautiful place to visit for generations to come.

They seek to make the area a beautiful place to visit for generations to come.

The Mohonk Preserve hosts various programs to educate their guests about the region. Rock The Ridge is a 50-mile endurance challenge and environmental fundraiser set in the natural beauty of the area. Along with the race, visitors can go on hikes, climb, and bike the trails. Donating to the foundation supports the unique wildlife, flora and fauna on this land which has been designated "one of Earth's last great places."

At #4 we have Teatown, a one thousand acre nature preserve and education center located in the Lower Hudson Valley. They make it their mission to inspire the community to participate in lifelong environmental stewardship. The region is home to a two-acre island refuge for over 230 species of native wildflowers. The foundation also hosts wildlife exhibits and natural science day camps in the summer and school breaks.

Teatown's goal is to instill a love of the environment, positive attitudes toward conservation, and a sense of personal and civic responsibility. They hope to conserve the region's biodiversity through creating awareness and allowing people to learn about the animals and other wildlife living there, through events like school field trips. Donations can be made to help sustain the area, or interested parties can participate in volunteer opportunities to help maintain the center.

Teatown's goal is to instill a love of the environment, positive attitudes toward conservation, and a sense of personal and civic responsibility.

At #5 we have the Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy. Founded in 1992, they seek to protect the natural, scenic, and agricultural landscapes of the surrounding areas. The conservation work includes eighteen public preserves for hiking, cross-country skiing, and other educational and recreational opportunities. They also attempt to protect natural resources to ensure clean water, healthy air, and working land for farming and forestry. They do this in the desire to promote a Capital Region suitable for current residents and for future generations.