6 Resources Making It Easier To Go Gluten Free

There are many kinds of food intolerances and allergies that can affect people, and gluten is one of them. If you have celiac disease or gluten sensitivities, check out the resources listed here, which include nonprofits, blogs, and innovative devices to help you achieve the diet you're looking for. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

6 Resources for a Gluten-Free Diet

Name What It Offers
Bread SRSLY San Francisco's first gluten-free sourdough bread company
Celiac Community Foundation of Northern California Provides evidence-based support to those with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the greater San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento region
Vegetarian Mamma A blog run by Cindy Gordon, who offers easy-to-make, gluten-free, vegetarian, and allergy-friendly recipes
Nima The world’s first portable food sensor, which detects gluten and peanut in food, delivering results in minutes
National Celiac Association Represents and serves individuals with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities through education and empowerment
Dishing Delish A 100% gluten-free food blog created by Jacqui Donnelly

What's the Deal With Gluten?

Quick Tips to Help You Stay Healthy

  1. Cook more meals at home
  2. Establish a workout routine
  3. Get a fitness tracker and compete with your friends
  4. Go for a hike now & then
  5. Take up yoga and stretch regularly
  6. Establish a regular sleeping pattern
  7. Make a smoothie in the morning

The Story Behind Nima

In Depth

Celiac Disease affects at least 3 million people in the United States, 97% being undiagnosed. It is also estimated that potentially 20 million people in the country are suffering with some sort of gluten intolerance. Having to remove a portion of one's diet can sometimes be a struggle. In no particular order, here are 6 resources to help in your transition to go gluten free.

First up at #1 is Bread Srsly where the goal is to reunite people with sourdough when they thought good bread was off the table. Before the industrialization of bread baking around the start of the 20th century, humans had been baking the same way for 30,000 years using traditional sourdough fermentation.

Turns out, this method of baking results in bread that is easy to digest, has a lower glycemic index, and is rich with bioavailable nutrients. Because Bread Srsly ferments only gluten free grains, like organic white rice, millet, and sorghum, real food lovers avoiding gluten can enjoy the many health benefits and deliciousness of true sourdough.

Turns out, this method of baking results in bread that is easy to digest, has a lower glycemic index, and is rich with bioavailable nutrients.

Next up at #2 is The Celiac Community Foundation of Northern California. This group originated as two nonprofit organizations and a children's camp that merged in 2012. The foundation provides evidence based support to those with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in the greater San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento region.

The Celiac Community Foundation of Northern California is an independent nonprofit organization that collaborates with the Celiac Disease Foundation and the National Celiac to heighten awareness, educate the medical community, food purveyors, and the general public, and administer a camp in partnership with The Taylor Family Foundation. It also facilitates medical research, provides online resources, and offers group and individual support.

Coming in at #3 is Vegetarian Mamma, a website offering easy to make, gluten free, vegetarian and/or allergy-friendly recipes. Cindy Gordon, the face behind Vegetarian Mamma, has been blogging and developing recipes since 2009. Also found on the site is information on items in the gluten free and allergy friendly communities.

Also found on the site is information on items in the gluten free and allergy friendly communities.

Cindy and her husband grew up eating meat but decided to make the switch to a vegetarian diet in 2005. In the past, the family has dealt with many food allergies with their children, including all peanuts, tree-nuts, dairy, gluten and soy. Cindy and her youngest son both have to eat gluten free and are dairy sensitive.

At #4 is Nima, the world's first connected food sensor, born out of MIT and engineered and developed by people who have food sensitivities and allergies. Nima's proprietary technology uses antibody based chemistry to rapidly detect proteins in a meal. The technology is packaged in a portable and easy to use format.

Each Nima capsule includes antibodies, a test strip, and a liquid extraction formula. As the test strip develops, an electronic sensor and associated algorithm detect the results in less than five minutes. Reading the results electronically reduces the likelihood of any misinterpretation. Nima is 97% accurate at detecting levels of 20 parts per million and above for gluten and 10 parts per million and above for peanut.

Nima is 97% accurate at detecting levels of 20 parts per million and above for gluten and 10 parts per million and above for peanut.

Next at #5 is The National Celiac Association. The NCA is a nonprofit organization dedicated to educating and advocating for individuals with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities, their families, and communities throughout the country. The organization offers three issues a year of Gluten-Free Nation, a full color print magazine, and a monthly e-newsletter, NCA News, with important and helpful items.

The NCA's practices include fostering a sense of community, keeping a close affiliation with a core of expert gastroenterologists and nutritionists, providing empowerment to deal with a chronic disease and sharing a positive outlook as ambassadors of the disease and offering membership, the dues of which support the celiac and gluten free community.

Lastly at #6 is Dishing Delish, a gluten free food blog created by Jacqui Donnelly. Donnelly, a blogger who is passionate about food, spends most of her time in her kitchen cooking and making new recipes. Diagnosed with celiac at the age of 14, all of the recipes on the site are 100% gluten free.

Donnelly, a blogger who is passionate about food, spends most of her time in her kitchen cooking and making new recipes.

Being diagnosed with Celiac inspired Donnelly to get a degree in Nutrition-Dietetics and now works as a food scientist in Tampa, Florida developing recipes for Dishing Delish. Going gluten free can be difficult at first, but Donnelly believes there is life after gluten and has a recipe for any occasion.