The 10 Best 24 Inch Monitors

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This wiki has been updated 7 times since it was first published in November of 2018. A 24-inch LCD monitor is right in the sweet spot for many users, whether you're trying to maximize office space or minimize the distance your eyes have to move across the screen. From lower resolutions with blazing-fast refresh rates to Quad and Ultra HD models with good pixel densities, there's a new and cutting-edge option available for consumers and professionals on any budget. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. If you'd like to contribute your own research to the Wiki, please get started by reviewing this introductory video.

1. Asus ProArt PA248QV

2. Acer Nitro XFA240Q

3. Dell Ultrasharp U2419HC

Editor's Notes

August 27, 2020:

The truth is, there haven't been many huge breakthroughs in display technology over the last couple years, and in one way, this is actually a positive thing. The monitors that were on the market just 18 months ago have, in many cases, been replaced by more refined options that are more reliable and lower priced than their predecessors, and that's just as evident in the 24-inch class as it is with larger models.

Of course, it's no surprise that the Dell Ultrasharp U2419HC is one of the best, as Dell's Ultrasharp line is often among the top choices. Similarly, the Asus ProArt PA248QV is closely related to some of the top professional displays on the market, and while this one isn't quite on the top-of-the-line level as some others, it offers impressive consistency and overall performance at a reasonable price. The Alienware AW2521HF is in much the same boat as the others, and is hard to beat if you're looking for a high-refresh rate option with a small field of view, which is exactly what many esports professionals prefer. The Acer Nitro XFA240Q is a similar high performer, and it's notably less expensive than the Alienware, for that matter.

Speaking of high performance, the ViewSonic VG2455 offers a 1440p resolution, and there aren't a ton of models in this size with that kind of pixel density. The LG UltraFine 24MD4KL is one of those high-density alternatives, and in fact is among the very few with a 4K resolution. It's primarily marketed toward MacBook users, but owners of high-performing Windows laptops with Thunderbolt 3 capability should be able to take almost full advantage of it, too. The BenQ SW240, meanwhile, is geared very much towards pros who require the best in terms of color gamut and accurate reproduction.

There are two that are very interesting despite not exactly being mainstream. The Philips 242B9T is one of the rare touchscreen options, and its durable build quality and dust and water protection make it a good choice for commercial use. Then there's the Sceptre C248B. We don't always recommend monitors from this or other lesser known manufacturers, but they've apparently increased their production quality significantly over the past few years, and this one is surprisingly affordable for a 144-hertz option.

November 13, 2018:

We really, really, really, wanted to include Samsung's 24-inch QLED monitor, because it's the only one this small with quantum-dot-filtered color. Unfortunately, Samsung monitors notoriously suffer from wildly inconsistent quality control, and some purchasers give up after 2 or 3 unsuccessful RMA attempts. Hopefully Samsung gets their act together soon. As it stands, the BenQ 2460 and Acer 240HY are fantastic budget options, the Dell simply looks amazing, and you really can't beat the color contrast of the Asus ProArt (thanks very much to its powerful HDR support). The HP and the BenQ Photo are ideal for many business ventures, and we found a rather new and apparently powerful touch option in the Lenovo, which was developed to accompany the brand's Tiny PCs.

4. Alienware AW2521HF

5. Asus VA24

6. ViewSonic VG2455

7. BenQ SW240

8. LG UltraFine 24MD4KL

9. Philips 242B9T

10. Sceptre C248B


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on August 30, 2020 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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