Updated February 17, 2021 by Brett Dvoretz

The 10 Best Atlases For Kids

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This wiki has been updated 15 times since it was first published in October of 2016. The earlier a child begins to understand his or her place in the wider world, the better. Therefore, a book that helps educate kids about everything from geography and international politics to global history is a priceless resource. Fortunately, most of the atlases on our list are not very expensive but are bristling with maps, facts, and photos that are sure to delight readers of all stripes. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. If you'd like to contribute your own research to the Wiki, please get started by reviewing this introductory video.

1. The 50 States

2. When on Earth?

3. Atlas of Animal Adventures

Editor's Notes

February 15, 2021:

A few things were important to use when choosing our recommendations. They should contain useful information, ideally recently updated; they should be engaging; and they should cover a wide range of topics, so whether a child wants to learn about places, history, or animals there is a book here for them.

With the focus of including recently updated or written books, we removed the old National Geographic Atlas and replaced it with the 4th edition of the National Geographic Kids Beginner's World Atlas, which was updated in 2019 and is their newest version. We also removed the 2014 Lonely Planet edition and replaced it with the 2020 Lonely Planet Kids Amazing World Atlas. At this time, we also chose to eliminate the City Atlas and replace it with the Merriam-Webster's Student Atlas, which contains a significantly broader range of information. It is also has a bit more of a serious, textbook-like feel than many of our other recommendations that is perfect for mature kids, and we felt that style was lacking in our previous selections.

We tried to find more modern replacements for the Space Atlas and My Pop-Up World Atlas, which were written in 2014 and 2012, respectively, but at this time there are no better options that either cover the same topics, or have the same kind of engaging format.

March 08, 2019:

Despite the Barefoot Books World Atlas' charming illustrations and focus on different cultures across the globe, we decided to remove it due to a high number of reported factual errors. Added When on Earth? because it not only explains interesting historical events (such as the Arab Spring and how agriculture began), but it also presents an excellent opportunity for parent-child bonding, as many adults are sure to learn something from it as well. The 50 States nabbed the top spot thanks to its abundance of clearly-conveyed information and compelling visuals. You'll also find the Atlas of Animal Adventures and the Space Atlas for the critter and astronomy lovers in your life, as well as a pop-up selection (My Pop-Up World Atlas) that's great for tots who are just beginning to read and need a bit of extra stimulus.

4. Kingfisher Atlas of World History

5. National Geographic Kids Beginner's World Atlas

6. Lonely Planet Kids Amazing World Atlas

7. Merriam-Webster's Student Atlas

8. DK Smithsonian Children's Illustrated

9. My Pop-Up World Atlas

10. Space Atlas


Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on February 17, 2021 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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