Updated March 14, 2019 by Sam Kraft

The 10 Best Cabinet Organizers

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This wiki has been updated 17 times since it was first published in September of 2015. Nothing hinders culinary creativity quite like a cluttered kitchen. Once you get those household items sorted and properly stored, maybe you’ll feel more inspired to create fresh and healthy masterpieces for the whole family. These cabinet organizers will keep everything out of the way, but close at hand, including cans, spices, cleaning materials, plates, pots and pans. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best cabinet organizer on Amazon.

10. Household Essentials Undersink

9. DecoBros Supreme Stackable

8. Organize It All Rack

7. SimpleHouseware Pantry

6. YouCopia Chef's Edition

5. Grayline Organizer

4. DecoBros Sliding Drawer

3. Rubbermaid Rack

2. Spectrum Diversified Euro

1. Rev-A-Shelf Pull-Out

Editor's Notes

March 13, 2019:

Noticed that some people have trouble assembling the DecoBros Supreme Stackable, and users should note that it’s advisable to secure it to another shelf or side wall to ensure its stability. Reports demonstrate that in spite of its super low-profile design and diminutive size, the SimpleHouseware Pantry keeps saucepans, cutting boards and baking sheets stable and secure with little to no sliding or shifting. We upped its ranking for this reason. On the other hand, we chose to demote the Household Essentials Undersink upon discovering frustration from some users that the rack’s second tier prevents them from storing certain tall items, such as bottles or tubes of liquid, on the first tier. While the YouCopia Chef’s Edition serves its purpose admirably in terms of maximizing available space and organizing spices, users don’t seem thrilled with its bland appearance or its relatively high price tag, hence its modest drop in the rankings.

Benefits Of Being Organized

That's not even taking into account the ramifications of misplacing a bill.

If you're naturally messy, then you've likely spent a lot of time promising yourself that you'll get your act together and your house cleaned up. Unfortunately, it can seem like every time you turn your back, all of your stuff just decides to jump off the shelves and scatter.

In fact, you may have even gone so far as to give up and decide that you'll just live a cluttered life. While this is understandable, you should know that being organized offers many advantages that you'd be missing out on.

The most obvious of these is that you'd have pride in the attractiveness of your home. Like it or not, people make assumptions about you based on your living conditions, and if you're drowning in junk, the conclusions they'll jump to won't be positive. Once your house is in order, though, you'll never again have to choke down that feeling of panic when a guest comes over unexpectedly.

Being organized can also boost your productivity. The average American spends two-and-a-half days each year looking for lost or misplaced items. I'm sure you can think of better uses of that time.

Knowing where everything is can be especially helpful in the kitchen. When your things are all over the place, you might find yourself starting a new recipe only to find you're missing key ingredients. Likewise, you're more likely to burn dinner if you constantly have to walk away from the stove to hunt down herbs and spices.

Not only that, but being neat can save you money. If you don't know where your things are, that decreases the likelihood that you'll waste money buying things you already own. That's not even taking into account the ramifications of misplacing a bill. If you forget to pay something and it dings your credit, that's a mistake that could potentially cost you thousands of dollars.

Finally, there's the matter of your mental health. It can be extremely stressful to look around and find yourself adrift in a sea of clutter, and that can make tidying up feel like an overwhelming, Sisyphean task.

Once you're organized, however, your home can be a place where you feel calm and at ease — you know, the way it's supposed to be.

Choosing The Right Cabinet Organizer

If you're taking the first step in conquering your clutter, organizing your cabinets can have a huge impact on the overall tidiness of your home.

There are a variety of storage options to choose from, with everything from racks and baskets to full-blown pantries available. Before you get started, think about where your clutter tends to be the densest, and which items really get in your way the most.

Before you get started, think about where your clutter tends to be the densest, and which items really get in your way the most.

If you have lots of pots and pans that need a home, then a rack is a good place to start. These wire organizers keep all your cookware in one place, helping you find the one you need in seconds.

On the other hand, if it's food that clutters up your counter tops, you'll need to take a different approach. Spice racks are incredible for herding your seasonings, and you could look into sliding baskets or free-standing storage cubes for canned goods.

Ultimately, you'll likely need to incorporate a variety of organizers into your life to keep everything in order. That's totally fine, and you don't need to do it all at once. The important thing is giving everything a place to live; once an item has a default location, you'll be able to find it when you need it — and you won't like seeing it outside its home.

Messy behavior can be changed, even for the most seemingly-hopeless individuals. It's important to make it easy on yourself, though, and a cabinet organizer can do just that.

How To Get A Handle On The Mess

Taking control over your clutter can be daunting. It seems like, once you start making headway, the mess calls in reinforcements, and suddenly you're overwhelmed with junk you've never even seen before.

It's OK, though. You can do this.

First off, don't think you have to do everything at once. That's a recipe for getting overwhelmed and quitting early, or never even starting at all. Instead, portion out the cleaning, either by doing a little bit every day or by taking breaks often. The Pomodoro Technique is excellent for this, as it gives you bite-sized portions of work with frequent rewards.

Try to be honest with yourself about whether you really need these items, and whether they fit into your life.

Of course, it's hard to put all your stuff away if you have more stuff than space. Getting rid of unneeded or unwanted items will go a long way towards making your home more habitable, and you may even be able to get a tax write-off for donating old clothes, furniture, and more.

This can be really difficult for some people, especially if you're the sentimental type (or if you just tend to be a pack rat). Try to be honest with yourself about whether you really need these items, and whether they fit into your life. For many physical items, like photos and CDs, you can store them on your computer and put the hard copies in storage or sell them.

Practicing "mise en place" can help as well. The basic strategy is to have a routine that accommodates your daily life. This can mean anything from establishing a cleaning routine (say, 30 minutes every day during the evening news) to keeping your keys and wallet in the same place.

The underlying idea here is that you'll never be clean and organized unless you make it easy. If it takes a massive amount of willpower to keep things tidy, your strength will eventually fail.

If, however, you find a way to make putting things away easier than leaving them out, then you'll be well on your way to a spotless home.

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Sam Kraft
Last updated on March 14, 2019 by Sam Kraft

In addition to his corporate career as a marketing and communications professional in Chicago, Sam runs a popular blog that focuses on the city’s flourishing craft beer and brewery scene. He received his degree in journalism from DePaul University (which spurred his interest in freelance writing) and has since spent years developing expertise in copywriting, digital marketing and public relations. A lifetime of fishing, hiking and camping trips has left him well-versed in just about any outdoors-related topic, and over several years spent working in the trades during his youth, he accumulated a wealth of knowledge about tools and machinery. He’s a travel junkie, a health and fitness enthusiast, and an avid biker.


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