Updated August 28, 2019 by Brett Dvoretz

The 6 Best Canvas Pliers

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This wiki has been updated 12 times since it was first published in May of 2016. If you are a painter, an art student, or work in a framing shop, you're going to want to take a look at these pliers. Designed for stretching a canvas prior to mounting in a frame, they come in models that are capable of delivering both gallery-wrapped and side-stretched canvases. And they are also handy for preparing leather and other fabrics for use in furnishings and decor. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best canvas plier on Amazon.

6. Jack Richeson Iron

5. Mexi Stretcher Tool

4. C.S. Osborne & Co. 250

3. C.S. Osborne 249

2. Fredrix T7400

1. MyLifeUnit Professional

Editor's Notes

August 27, 2019:

Stretching canvas may not be a fun job. but it can become a lot easier with the right pair of pliers. The major difference between traditional pliers and those dedicated to stretching fabric is the width of the head, with that latter having a significantly bigger one. Many canvas pliers will also have a metal protrusion on one of the jaws that can help create leverage or be used for hammering down staples, such as can be seen on every model on our list except the Mexi Stretcher Tool.

If you are working in a gallery setting where even the slightest damage can have serious repercussions, we recommend the MyLifeUnit Professional, as they feature flat jaws with rubber strips, rather than the more traditional toothed design. Along with the C.S. Osborne 249 and C.S. Osborne 250, they also feature a coated handle to provide your palm with a bit of cushioning, making all of these models comfortable for long periods of use and ideal for professional use.

If you are looking for a budget option and don't expect any marathon sessions of stretching, there is no reason you can't go with Fredrix T7400, Mexi Stretcher Tool, or Jack Richeson Iron, all of which have bare-metal handles. Though this can be a bit of a pain for some, it shouldn't be too much of an issue if you are only stretching a couple of pieces in each sitting, and they will get the job done reliably while saving you a few bucks.


Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on August 28, 2019 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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