Updated December 14, 2019 by Sam Kraft

The 10 Best Cornhole Sets

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 20 times since it was first published in June of 2015. Suitable for both indoor and outdoor play, cornhole takes mere seconds to learn, but a lifetime to master, and a decent set can provide years of fun to children and adults. These options come in an array of styles, from regulation-sized sets made of premium wood, to miniature, foldable models crafted from lightweight materials for excellent portability. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best cornhole set on Amazon.

10. Backyard Champs Game

9. Himal Portable

8. GoSports Pro

7. Tiannbu Tailgate

6. Zeny Lawn

5. Slick Woody's Rustic Grey

4. GoSports Premium

3. Slick Woody's Burnt

2. EastPoint Sports Full

1. Vorticy Long

Special Honors

R&R Outdoors From a company that encourages folks to get out of the house and enjoy the outdoors, you’ll find two sets that are made with marine-grade aluminum to withstand the elements. They both feature cut-out handles for easy transport, and you’ll be able to choose from 10 bean bag colors. randroutdoorfun.com

Guy Harvey Tarpon These artistic boards are handmade in the United States, resulting in a set that embodies the type of high-quality craftsmanship you’ll enjoy showing off to your friends. The surface depicts a giant fish leaping out of the water, making it ideal for a beach party or a sunny tailgate setting. guyharvey.com

Trex Cornhole Most cornhole sets, if left in the rain, aren’t going to come out on the other end looking pretty. That won’t be the case with this one, which is built with a resilient PVC material that should withstand whatever Mother Nature decides to throw at it. The bags are machine washable, too. trexcornhole.com

Editor's Notes

December 11, 2019:

Several items had to be taken off the list, including the Best Choice Toss and Himal Outdoor, both of which were no longer available. One model’s surface was so slick and bouncy that it rendered normal gameplay nearly impossible, while another tended to warp easily, with bubbles appearing on the surface after a certain amount of time had passed.

We added a variety of new items to the rankings, including a miniature model designed specifically for kids, an ultra-portable set made of lightweight fabric instead of wood, and even an option with built-in LED lights for gameplay in the dark.

While most items have some sort of visual design on the surface, the Zeny Lawn is left intentionally blank so that the user can decide how to decorate it. Some choose to paint it a solid color, while others create their own illustrations or simply cover it in stickers.

Cornhole 101: How To Attempt A Proper Throw

Place the leg opposite your throwing arm forward, then toss the bag with an appropriate arc.

So you want to be a cornhole player? That's understandable. Cornhole's all the rage these days. And yet to avoid making a fool of yourself, you want to at least appear as if you know what you are doing. Simple enough. Cornhole isn't rocket science. The overriding goal is to land a bean bag either on a board, or in the hole.

In terms of throwing, the first area any amateur wants to consider is his grip. Players want to hold the bean bag loose. Clutching a bean bag tight is prone to result in an off-kilter trajectory. When releasing the bag, assume a stance that makes it look like you are pitching a horseshoe. Place the leg opposite your throwing arm forward, then toss the bag with an appropriate arc. Release the bag underhand, then follow through instead of stopping short. As your aim improves, you can practice placing a horizontal - or even vertical - spin on the bag. Advanced techniques like this may help the bean bag bounce, bank, or slide into the hole.

A horizontal spin, in particular, combined with a low-angle arc, will cause a cornhole bag to slide across the board. This is important in that collisions are a great way to maximize points. When you bank a bean bag in, you earn a point while also taking a potential point away from your opponents. Any high, flat throw, on the other hand, will likely result in a static landing, creating very little chance for something dynamic to occur.

If you want a more active slide, it's best to use a brand-new bean bag. Newer bags haven't been broken in yet, which means the beans and the fabric are packed tight, and they're more liable to slip and slide upon hitting the board. This is a good thing in certain cases, but not all. If a high-action bag begins to slide too much, it could glide right over the hole.

10 Cornhole Terms That Every Novice Must Know

Cornhole has its very own culture, which comes complete with an intricate set of jargon. While the vernacular is expansive, here are 10 terms any novice should know if he or she plans on being an active participant in the game:

  1. Ace: This is when a bean bag lands on the board, but not in the hole. An ace is worth one point.

This is when one player's bean bag knocks another bean bag off the board.

  1. Blocker: This is a bean bag that lands over the top of the hole, essentially stopping other bean bags from banking down or sliding in.
  1. Cornhole: This is a bean bag that lands directly in the hole. It is worth three points.
  1. Cornucopia: This means someone has landed all four bean bags in the hole during one inning.
  1. Gusher (AKA "Four Bagger"): This means that someone has landed all four bags in the cornhole in the same round.
  1. Police: In official play, this is a cornhole referee.
  1. Screaming Eagle: This is a throw that sends the bean bag soaring over and past the board completely, prompting other players to squawk like an eagle.
  1. Shortbag: This is a bag that lands just short of the board.
  1. Shucker. This is when one player's bean bag knocks another bean bag off the board.
  1. Skunk: This is either a complete shutout, or a game that automatically ends - under certain rules - at 11-0.

A Brief History Of Cornhole

It's difficult to pin down when the game of cornhole was invented. Certain legends hold that the pastime was developed by European farmers during the 15th Century, while other stories maintain that a group of Midwestern kids came up with the idea based on tossing rocks into a well.

What is known is that the term "cornhole" was initially derived from the practice of filling a burlap bag up with kernels, then aiming that bag at an equivalent hole cut into a sheet of plywood, which was leaned up against a barn.

Accidents are a mild concern when it comes to backyard horseshoes, and serious injuries were nearly enough to sideline lawn darts for good.

Conceptually speaking, cornhole is little more than a lighthearted offshoot of horseshoes. The primary difference being that cornhole bags feel soft and quasi-weightless, which means there's little chance of anybody getting hurt. Accidents are a mild concern when it comes to backyard horseshoes, and serious injuries were nearly enough to sideline lawn darts for good.

Cornhole, by way of comparison, can be played by just about anyone, anywhere. Bar owners don't need to worry about liability issues, and tailgaters don't need to worry about accidental damage to their cars.

Today cornhole is wildly popular, especially in rural areas, and along the shore. Amateurs equate the game with drinking. That said, there are also high-stakes cornhole tournaments, complete with prize money, and governed by official rules. The American Cornhole Organization, established in 2004, remains the only governing body for the pastime. This organization sanctions products, sponsors events, and establishes rankings for the sport.

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Sam Kraft
Last updated on December 14, 2019 by Sam Kraft

In addition to his corporate career as a marketing and communications professional in Chicago, Sam runs a popular blog that focuses on the city’s flourishing craft beer and brewery scene. He received his degree in journalism from DePaul University (which spurred his interest in freelance writing) and has since spent years developing expertise in copywriting, digital marketing and public relations. A lifetime of fishing, hiking and camping trips has left him well-versed in just about any outdoors-related topic, and over several years spent working in the trades during his youth, he accumulated a wealth of knowledge about tools and machinery. He’s a travel junkie, a health and fitness enthusiast, and an avid biker.


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