Updated February 13, 2019 by Brett Dvoretz

The 10 Best Dive Boots

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

We spent 22 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Dive boots serve a number of very important functions. They help to keep your feet warm, prevent blisters from fin straps and, if you often set off on your ocean explorations from the shore or find yourself walking across shallow shoals, they protect your feet from cuts and scrapes. We've made sure to include models well suited to both tropical and cooler water conditions. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best dive boot on Amazon.

10. Seavenger Atlantis

9. Mares Equator

8. Seac Pro HD

7. O'Neill Tropical

6. Neo Sport 3mm

5. Tusa Imprex

4. Aqua Lung Superzip Ergo

3. Scubapro Unisex Delta

2. Cressi Tall

1. Mares Trilastic

Editor's Notes

February 08, 2019:

As a general rule of thumb for both booties and wetsuits, two- and three-millimeter neoprene is best for tropical dives, while five to seven millimeters is best for temperate dives. We wanted to make sure our rankings included cold and warm-water options, so you'll find models like the Cressi Tall, which come in a seven-millimeter thick option, and the Mares Equater, which feature a low cut and are only two millimeters thick. Another important consideration is sole type. Those who shore dive will need something with a very thick sole that won't be torn up from sharp rocks, such as the Mares Trilastic. Soft soles are a good choice for people who dive from soft, sandy beaches or boats, since they are lighter in weight and generally provide more flexibility when you kick and walk. The Neo Sport 3mm are one such model on our list. Another pet peeve of many divers is when a zipper starts to slide down during a dive, causing the boot to loosen and allowing a lot of water to gush in, so we made sure that every model on our list either has a very reliable zipper, a Velcro strap to prevent it from sliding, or was completely zipperless.


Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on February 13, 2019 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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