Updated March 20, 2021 by Sheila O'Neill

The 10 Best Heat Transfer Papers

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This wiki has been updated 15 times since it was first published in April of 2018. Whether you want to promote your band or make matching t-shirts for a family vacation, these easy-to-use heat transfer papers are a quick way to get the job done with just a printer and a regular iron or press machine. Images fading after washing customized fabrics is a common problem, but this list includes more durable options that survive laundering well and are unlikely to crack. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki.

1. Avery DIY

2. Printworks for Inkjet

3. Neenah 3G Jet-Opaque

Editor's Notes

March 18, 2021:

We removed the PureBloom Products Roll in this update because most consumers want an option that is easy to use in a printer, and the fact that this model came on a continuous roll would be a con rather than a pro for many.

New to the list, the Printers Jack Sublimation is a good choice for those who want to make large amounts of merchandise, rather than casual users making a few t-shirts for special events. These sheets can be used on ceramic mugs and phone cases as well as fabric, however they do require sublimation ink and a heat press machine, unlike most options which are compatible with regular printer ink and an iron.

The Jolee's Boutique Glow have a unique feature that is sure to be a hit at a nighttime event: they glow in the dark. Just make sure to follow the directions carefully and know that it might take some effort to remove the paper backing.

Before you buy, make sure that your equipment and materials are compatible with the sheets you're looking at. While most of these can be used with inkjet printers, some, like the Forever No-Cut, require a laser printer. The packaging should also list the types of materials that they work on (cotton, polyester, etc.), so if you already have the blank shirts in hand, you'll want to pay attention to that detail as well. Some sheets are fine in a cutting machine while with others, you're better off using a pair of scissors.

Whichever option you go with, remember that any time you're using heat for a craft project, you need to be careful. Don't let children use these unsupervised and make sure that you're working on a heat-resistant surface.

October 19, 2019:

Before discussing our choices, we'd like to quickly note that every one of them require careful direction-following for the best results. There are quite a few variables that can affect the outcome of your projects, from the printer you use to the orientation of your design, so you should take the time to read all instructions thoroughly before you start. You may also find that a T-shirt heat press offers better results than an iron. With that said, most won't be surprised to see that Avery comes out on top. It's a go-to for this type of crafting for its relative ease of use, high quality, and budget-friendly pricing. We've also kept options from Neenah and Printworks, as they're also useable and generally do well in the wash. Neenah papers tend to be the more expensive option, but they have the slight edge when it comes to durability. And speaking of durability, we decided to remove the choice from Transfer Magic. Even with careful, deliberate use, it struggles to offer long-lasting results.

4. NuFun Activities Iron On

5. Printers Jack Sublimation

6. Jolee's Boutique Glow

7. Neenah 3G Jet-Opaque 11 by 17

8. Forever No-Cut

9. Neenah Jet-Pro Soft Stretch

10. PPD Premium


Sheila O'Neill
Last updated on March 20, 2021 by Sheila O'Neill

Sheila is a writer and editor living in sunny Southern California. She studied writing and film at State University of New York at Purchase, where she earned her bachelor of arts degree. After graduating, she worked as an assistant video editor at a small film company, then spent a few years doing freelance work, both as a writer and a video editor. During that time, she wrote screenplays and articles, and edited everything from short films to infomercials. An ardent lover of the English language, she can often be found listening to podcasts about etymology and correcting her friends’ grammar.


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