The 10 Best Lego Building Books

video play icon
365 Things to do
Klutz Chain Reactions
The Adventure Book

This wiki has been updated 14 times since it was first published in March of 2018. Lego has been keeping fans of all ages entertained for generations with bricks that can be combined to form anything from cars to dragons to rocket ships. But with so many possibilities, it can be hard to know where to start. That's where these building books can come in handy. With thousands of tips, instructions, and inspirations, they offer something for every level of builder. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best lego building book on Amazon.

10. Awesome Ideas

9. Klutz Chain Reactions

8. 365 Things to do

7. Birds From Bricks

6. The Architect

5. The Adventure Book

4. The Neighborhood Book

3. Build It! Volume 1

2. Awesome Creations

1. The Ideas Book

Editor's Notes

March 03, 2020:

When you have a large number of LEGO bricks with absolutely no idea of what or how to build, constructing an amazing creation is easier said than done. Fortunately, there are many books that will get your mind working and provide some much-needed inspiration. Recommended designs are often colorful and detailed, made by master builders who’ve pushed the limits of human imagination. Leveraging the countless types of LEGO bricks that are available to most anyone, these authors will walk you through techniques and ideas to support your building endeavors.

Certain books like Birds From Bricks and The Architect specialize in a specific theme. They often go into great detail about real-life facts, leading to pages with significantly more substance than a rigid step-by-step guide. As a result, they make for an intriguing read even for those who aren’t looking to build with LEGO. High-resolution photos, personal reflections, and tons of research all contribute to the appeal of these books.

You also have publications like The Ideas Book with a massive assortment of creations for all ages. These try to jam-pack as many different ideas into a single compendium as possible, letting readers choose to engage with the ones that stand out to them. For those looking to bolster their collection of models, look no further than these compilation-style books.


Sheila O'Neill
Last updated on March 05, 2020 by Sheila O'Neill

Sheila is a writer and editor living in sunny Southern California. She studied writing and film at State University of New York at Purchase, where she earned her bachelor of arts degree. After graduating, she worked as an assistant video editor at a small film company, then spent a few years doing freelance work, both as a writer and a video editor. During that time, she wrote screenplays and articles, and edited everything from short films to infomercials. An ardent lover of the English language, she can often be found listening to podcasts about etymology and correcting her friends’ grammar.


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