The 10 Best Makeup Mirrors

Updated April 30, 2018 by Sheila O'Neill

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We spent 44 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Perfect for your vanity or a bathroom counter, our selection of makeup mirrors includes lighted options and high magnifications that will enable you to groom and apply makeup flawlessly. Available in countertop, permanently mounted, and conveniently portable designs, you can get one for the home and one for when you travel, or opt for a versatile model can perform well in either role. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best makeup mirror on Amazon.

10. Floxite LED

9. Jerdon Tri-Fold

8. DecoBros Extension

7. Illuminate Travel

6. Conair Oval

5. Mirrorvana Frameless

4. Fancii Daylight

3. MiroPure Tri-Fold

2. DecoBros Tabletop

1. Simple Human Sensor

What Makes A Good Makeup Mirror?

Makeup mirrors are designed to highlight and zoom in on the subtle curves of the face, and the particular texture of makeup, in ways that standard mirrors simply cannot. The most thorough ones have adjustable side panels so a person can see the front of their face, and their profile from both sides, at the same time. This is the best way to actually know if they're applying makeup evenly on their cheeks and temples.

If you want to know how your makeup will look out in the real world, then the best light to use when doing your makeup is natural light. Since that isn't always an option, there are certain types of lights that best mimic natural light, such as pure white. Once you have found the best light bulb, make sure your makeup mirror has a magnification side.

Five times magnification is ideal for more detailed jobs like eyebrow plucking. Magnification can also help one examine their pores to make sure makeup isn't clogging them too much or causing blackheads. Considering the tremendous amount of pores humans have, it's a good idea to examine them regularly for any blockage.

Since you'll need your hands to do your makeup, you need a mirror that not only has an adjustable angle but will stay in place so you don't need to hold it. On the topic of angles, the more degrees a mirror can rotate, the better. If a person intends to put their makeup mirror on a surface, like a vanity table, they should look for one with a small base so it won't take up much room. If you plan on mounting your mirror to a wall, consider one with an adjustable arm so you can manipulate its positioning.

The History Of Mirrors

There are countless stories from ancient mythology that involve someone catching their own reflection in a still pond, and believing it to be another person. The first man-made mirror, however, didn't come to be until 2900 BCE, when the Ancient Egyptians carved them out of polished bronze and attached handles to them made from either ivory, wood or metal. There is also a cast bronze mirror that historians have dated back to 2000 BCE China.

These original mirrors were only large enough to reflect one's face, but the Ancient Greeks are accredited with creating full-length mirrors sometime between 4 and 65 BCE. They would typically decorate their mirrors with images of the gods. The most commonly represented gods were Aphrodite, the goddess of beauty and love, and Eros, the god of desire. There was even a version of a compact cosmetic mirror at the time; it was housed in a boxed metal cover, and people would carry it around with them.

In Ancient Greece, mirrors were considered very valuable. The Greeks evolved from carving them out of simple bronze and began making them out of silver and gold, and adding gems. Some women paid a price for a mirror equal to a woman's dowry at the time. Meanwhile, the Japanese considered mirrors to be sacred objects. Since mirrors arrived in Japan, they've been an important part of imperial rituals. They're also used to ward off evil spirits, and to communicate with the gods.

Where Makeup Fits Into Feminism

The standard definition of feminism is the advocacy of women's rights in all matters of life, from the social arena to the political and economic ones. For centuries, many women have felt that society stripped them of the right to go makeup-less. To this day, major publications dedicate entire pages to images of celebrities who are not wearing makeup, pushing the notion that this is revolutionary, or even inappropriate. Trends like these inspired a more recent trend; the no-makeup movement.

Advocates of the movement say that it is liberating, and intended to show women they do not need conventional beauty products like makeup and bras. But a new wave of feminists argues that the movement is exclusive. Many say that the use of the words, "women don't need makeup," imply that the women who do wear makeup do so because they feel they need to when, in fact, they may just want to. One such group that states women should get to choose whether or not they wear makeup are the lipstick feminists.

There is a third group that doesn't quite side with or against the no makeup movement. Many people believe that, while it is true women should get to choose whether or not to wear makeup, and shouldn't be deemed as anti-feminist for doing so, they argue that perhaps the reason women want to wear makeup is inherently anti-feminist. Essentially they argue centuries of pressure to wear makeup have made women subconsciously believe they need it, and now they struggle to know if they actually want to wear it or are responding to societal pressure.


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Last updated on April 30, 2018 by Sheila O'Neill

Sheila is a writer, cosplayer, and juggler who lives in Southern California. She loves sitting down with a hot cup of tea and coming up with new ideas. In her spare time, Sheila enjoys drawing, listening to podcasts, and describing herself in the third person.


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