The 10 Best Music Stands

Updated June 09, 2017 by Brett Dvoretz

10 Best Music Stands
Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive
We spent 40 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Nothing beats the sound of live music, so if you're a performer of any type, we salute you. Whether you need it for school, for home, busking or the concert hall, one of these music stands should be perfect for your playing or practicing needs. When picking the best one for you, consider portability, durability, and price. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best music stand on Amazon.

10. Hisonic Signature Series 7125

The Hisonic Signature Series 7125 can be raised to a maximum height of 58 inches, which should serve even the tallest of musicians. It is quite sturdy and capable of supporting heavy music books, yet somehow manages to weigh less than 2lbs.
  • durable canvas carrying bag
  • needs to be broken down for travel
  • difficult to adjust the tilt
Brand Hisonic
Model 7125
Weight 2.5 pounds
Rating 4.1 / 5.0

9. On-Stage SM7211B

The On-Stage SM7211B has rolled edges, so there are no sharp areas that couple potentially cause injury. Its tripod-style legs can be adjusted through, and set into, a range of positions for ideal stability and to fit onto cluttered stages or in crowded pits.
  • rubber feet to prevent slippage
  • solid construction
  • somewhat heavy at 10lbs
Brand OnStage
Model SM7211
Weight 8.2 pounds
Rating 4.0 / 5.0

8. ChromaCast CC-MStand Kit

The tiltable ChromaCast CC-MStand Kit folds up compactly into an included carrying bag for travel, and is constructed with a two-tier shaft, so the user can sit or stand while they play. It also comes with a dual-head gooseneck light for use in dim areas.
  • budget-friendly price
  • wide enough for a three-page song
  • bookplate lip isn't deep enough
Brand ChromaCast
Model CC-MSTAND-KIT-1
Weight 2.9 pounds
Rating 3.8 / 5.0

7. Kruzco 5219

The Kruzco 5219 has metal spring arm extensions with rubber tips to protect your sheet music and hold it in place while you play, making it ideal for outdoor use in windy conditions. The bookplate clips in and out quickly when needed.
  • can be used sitting or standing
  • all-black finish
  • sets up and breaks down quickly
Brand Kruzco
Model Kru-5219
Weight 4.9 pounds
Rating 3.5 / 5.0

6. Gearlux MS100

The Gearlux MS100 is wide and deep enough to hold a three-ring binder, so you should never have trouble with it accommodating even the largest song books. The tray is raised and lowered with an easy locking twist knob in the middle of the stand's shaft.
  • allows for magnet use
  • 180-degree tray tilt
  • vented bookplate design
Brand Gearlux
Model MS100
Weight 6.6 pounds
Rating 3.8 / 5.0

5. D'Luca DLMSS Conductor

The D'Luca DLMSS Conductor has an incredibly robust and durable design, but doesn't feel overly bulky after it has been collapsed for storage or transport. Those qualities together mean it is a great choice for the traveling performer.
  • high-quality locking mechanisms
  • built-in sheet music clamps
  • rubber feet caps
Brand D'Luca
Model DLMSS
Weight 7.8 pounds
Rating 3.9 / 5.0

4. Be Sharpe Music 5063

When it comes to portability, it is hard to beat the Be Sharpe Music 5063. The shaft telescopes down to a mere 20 inches, while the bookplate and legs fold up into an area just 4 inches in diameter. The entire package weighs a touch over 2lbs.
  • surprisingly sturdy
  • three height adjustment points
  • includes a waterproof carrying bag
Brand Be Sharpe Music
Model Be -5063
Weight 2.7 pounds
Rating 4.4 / 5.0

3. Peak SMS-20

The shaft and legs of the Peak SMS-20 are constructed out of high strength tubular steel for optimal durability, while a plastic folding desk top lightens the load and allows for compact storage. The entire unit is highly moisture and corrosion-resistant.
  • quick clamp adjustment levers
  • 2-inch lip accommodates most needs
  • has a stable stance
Brand Peak Music Stands
Model SMS-20
Weight 5.5 pounds
Rating 4.6 / 5.0

2. Musician's Gear Deluxe

The Musician's Gear Deluxe features an extremely sturdy steel bookplate that can tilt all the way from a near horizontal position to a near vertical one to suit any musician's playing style. It can also be completely removed from the shaft if needed.
  • height adjusts from 24 to 45 inches
  • allows for compact storage
  • can support heavy sheet music
Brand Musician's Gear
Model MGSM7211B USED
Weight 7.8 pounds
Rating 4.9 / 5.0

1. Manhasset Mh5001

The Manhasset Mh5001 is a professional quality option that is made out of rigid, lightweight aluminum and perfect for use in orchestras or for other onstage performances. For added convenience, it has been designed to be raised and lowered with a single hand.
  • double lip for pens or a bow
  • corners are nicely rounded
  • tilt is easy to adjust
Brand Manhasset
Model 5001
Weight 7.4 pounds
Rating 4.7 / 5.0

How to Choose a Stand That's Best for You

"They all look alike." This is what my mother said. I was a kid at the time, and she had taken me to pick out a music stand for my electric guitar. We were in a cramped store, where all of the music stands had been relegated to one corner. Short of asking an employee, we had no real way of differentiating one of those stands from another.

Fortunately, a lot has changed since then. Today's consumers have the luxury of performing a little bit of research before they decide. If you're in the market for a music stand, the first thing you'll want to consider is what you need that music stand for. Let's say you're taking lessons, for example. In that case, you'd want a stand that is collapsible. If you bike or walk to those lessons, then you'd want a stand that comes with a case that features a shoulder strap, as well.

If you're a professional musician, on the other hand, you'll need a reliable stand that won't fall over. You'll also want a stand with a solid shelf, one that'll allow you to shuffle several sheets - or binders - at a time. If you're playing outside, then you'll want a stand that comes with clips for securing sheet music. If you're playing with an ensemble, it's apropos for every member to have a similar model and color.

Beyond that, you just want to confirm that the stand is adjustable. You also want to confirm that the legs come with protectors or rubber caps, so the metal or aluminum won't scratch up your floor.

Several Music-Stand Hacks That Are Convenient, Easy, And Fun

The term music stand evokes images of a conductor, or chamber music, or perhaps some soloist in a rehearsal space, running through a movement on her own. Ironically, a music stand can be repurposed for any number of things. Let's take a look at some of the cool things people are using these stands for in their homes.

A music stand isn't made for holding hardback books, per say, but it can certainly be used to hold a magazine if you happen to be following a recipe while standing up. A music stand can just as easily be used for referencing step-by-step instructions that you take from any home-improvement guide.

A music stand can be used as an elevated station for any digital tablet. In fact, you may even be able to use that tablet as a word processor, assuming you can plug a keyboard into the USB. Either that or kick back and watch a movie while you recline on the couch. Placing the tablet on an adjustable stand means you don't have to hold it in your hands or rest it in your lap.

If the base of your music stand is set up like a tripod, chances are you can detach it. With a little handiwork you can use that mini tripod to hold a camera, or a mirror, or a pen light, or a scope. You can also detach the stand's adjustable pole along with one of its wire clips (these are used for holding sheet music) to create a DIY selfie stick. There are any number of apps that'll allow you to take photos by using hand gestures instead of a remote control.

A Brief History of The Music Stand

Music stands were originally invented as early as 200 BC by the Ancient Chinese. And yet these stands didn't really come into their own until 1500 years later, during the European Renaissance. The more nuanced and polyphonic a piece of music - or symphonic movement - became, the more reliant individual musicians became on notation. Early music sheets were written by hand until Gutenberg invented the first printing press in 1440. From that point forward there was a marked difference in the way any ensemble piece of music was notated and performed.

Early music stands were wooden with certain models maintaining a shaft that could be adjusted via screw. During the 1800s, metal would prove a much more efficient replacement for wood. Modern stands eventually went from folding to collapsing, thereby providing an easier form of transport. The standard screw used for adjusting a stand was replaced with a metal collar. Height adjustment went from taking minutes to taking seconds.

For all the changes in technology over the past 50 years, the modern music stand has remained essentially unchanged. Certain models are more efficient, sure, while others have been designed with additional features, or perhaps a sturdier tripod for support. In the final analysis, the most significant difference would have to be the selection. It's a buyer's market when it comes to music stands these days, which means with the right amount of research, it's a lot easier to find a stand that represents a perfect fit for you.



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Last updated on June 09, 2017 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as behind the computer screen, Brett can either be found hacking furiously away at the keyboard or perhaps enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He hopes to one day become a modern day renaissance man.


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