The 6 Best Print Servers

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This wiki has been updated 8 times since it was first published in February of 2019. If you're working with an older printer that doesn't have built-in networking capabilities, a dedicated server can breathe new life into it. These are built to accept a USB or DB25 serial connection and hook up via cable to a LAN or wireless router. Take note that you may have to change a few settings within the network for some of these to work, so a bit technical expertise may be needed. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best print server on Amazon.

6. IOGear GPSU21

5. StarTech PM1115

4. CanaKit Raspberry Pi 3 B+

2. HP JetDirect 170X

Editor's Notes

April 18, 2019:

Print servers are a great way to extend the life of older printers in offices and homes. They're especially useful for large-format or other specialized printers. The main drawback of these devices is that they aren't always easy to install. They do require that your network is set up in a certain way, so you might need some help from the IT department to get them working just right.

With that said, the TP-Link will likely give you the least trouble. It's about as close as they get to plug-and-play. The HP JetDirect is similarly straightforward, though it's a touch older and slower. Of note is the D-Link, whose 3 total ports can keep 3 active printers at the ready, which is great for busy offices. The StarTech and the IOGear are both very compact and relatively inexpensive, though there are mixed reports of their compatibility with later operating systems, especially MacOS.

Which brings us to the Raspberry Pi. If you're handy enough to install all of these, you might also be capable of programming this bad boy. It'll take a little time, but it comes with all the physical pieces you'll need, and there are a lot of step-by-step tutorials online that explain how to configure the Linux-based CUPS software that will turn the Pi into a highly capable wireless print server. If you're willing to put in that time and effort, and learn something in the process, it's almost certain to deliver extremely high performance as well as reliability.


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on April 19, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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