Updated August 29, 2019 by Daniel Imperiale

The 10 Best Straight Grinders

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 5 times since it was first published in August of 2019. Whether you're working in an auto body shop or crafting fine pieces of furniture, the straight grinders on our list will be indispensable to your projects. We've included models suitable for a number of tasks, from small pneumatic options to large electrical offerings that utilize either mains cords or lithium-ion batteries, all ranked here by their power, handling, and durability. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best straight grinder on Amazon.

10. DeWalt DWMT70783

9. Aircat 6260 Red & Black

8. Chicago Electric 44141

7. Milwaukee M18 Fuel

6. Dewalt DWE4887

5. Makita GD0601

4. DeWalt DCG426B Max

3. Makita GS5000

2. Chicago Pneumatic CP860

1. DeWalt DW888

Editor's Notes

August 26, 2019:

Putting this ranking together, we encountered an enormous number of options, and found that — as one might expect — many of the industry's most recognizable brand names had the most to offer. We prioritized pneumatic and corded options over battery-powered tools simply because the kind of work most often done with die grinders is in some kind of workshop, and our research revealed that while a robust battery-powered option was desirable, features like variable speeds, steady operation, and low vibrations seemed to trump portability. The Dewalt in our top spot is easily the best example of an option that offers a little bit of everything, with variable speeds and a fast, smooth motor. Among pneumatic options, there was also a fair amount of scrutiny given to the direction of the exhaust, as any airflow that could potentially decrease visibility by kicking up debris around the workpiece could be considered a bit of a hazard.

Ergonomics played an important part in our ranking, as well. The Makita GS5000 and Dewalt DCG426B shine here with their extended front nozzles, which provide a sturdy grip for your preferred hand to help guide the tool and reduce strain. Chicago Electric's model that landed at number eight boasts a similar feature, but without any kind of coating, you're just holding onto the metal, so any vibrations the tool creates would be felt completely, reduced only by a pair of decent work gloves.


Daniel Imperiale
Last updated on August 29, 2019 by Daniel Imperiale

Daniel Imperiale holds a bachelor’s degree in writing, and proudly fled his graduate program in poetry to pursue a quiet life at a remote Alaskan fishery. After returning to the contiguous states, he took up a position as an editor and photographer of the prestigious geek culture magazine “Unwinnable” before turning his attention to the field of health and wellness. In recent years, he has worked extensively in film and music production, making him something of a know-it-all when it comes to camera equipment, musical instruments, recording devices, and other audio-visual hardware. Daniel’s recent obsessions include horology (making him a pro when it comes to all things timekeeping) and Uranium mining and enrichment (which hasn’t proven useful just yet).


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