The 10 Best Tamagoyaki Pans

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This wiki has been updated 7 times since it was first published in May of 2020. If you enjoy Japanese egg dishes, a tamagoyaki pan is a useful tool to have in your kitchen. Designed especially for making the rolled omelets found in sushi restaurants, they let you create this traditional food in the comfort of your home. From cast iron to nonstick, and in either a square or rectangular shape, there's an option here to suit the needs of both professional and amateur chefs. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki.

1. Li-Gelisi LI-15-18

2. TeChef Colour Collection EPIHM

3. RockUrWok Honcook Japanese Omelet

Editor's Notes

June 07, 2020:

Tamagoyaki is a special kind of Japanese omelet that is rolled, rather than folded over. Though recipes vary, it is generally made with soy sauce, dashi, mirin, and a bit of sugar, which gives it a savory and slightly sweet taste that, along with the unusual shape, really make it distinct from your average American or French omelet. While many might like to try their hand a cooking one in their home, you can't just use any old non-stick pan. To truly make a beautiful tamagoyaki that rivals those found in your favorite sushi restaurant, you'll need one of the small, purpose-made, square- or rectangle-shaped pans found on this list.

Traditionally, they are made in either iron pans, such as the Li-Gelisi LI-15-18, Lodge L5WS3 Wonder Skillet, and Kotobuki 410-541, or copper, like the Asahi CNE117. Of the former, the Li-Gelisi LI-15-18 is our favorite because of its solid wood handle, heavily sloped front, and large hanging loop. If cared for properly, it, along with the Lodge L5WS3 Wonder Skillet, should last for decades, if not longer. If you went into the kitchen of many sushi restaurants in Japan, you would probably find something like the Asahi CNE117 being used to prepare your tamagoyaki. While it does offer a bit of a steep learning curve for amateur cooks, professional chefs who are experienced with such pans will find it to be one of the best options.

The average home cook who is looking for something easy and low maintenance may want to opt for something made from aluminum or steel pan with a non-stick coating. The TeChef Colour Collection EPIHM, Rockurwok Honcook Japanese Omelet, TeChef CeraTerra Ceramic, GreenPan CW001360-015, Nordic Ware 16230, and IBBM Mini Frying all fit within this category. If you want pan that you can also toss in the over for some baking, you'll want to check out the TeChef CeraTerra Ceramic, which is can handle temperatures up to 450 degrees Fahrenheit, or the TeChef Colour Collection EPIHM and GreenPan CW001360-015, both of which are safe for use up to 350 degrees. The Nordic Ware 16230 is interesting because of its divided design, which makes it great for whipping up a quick breakfast of multiple items in a single pan. While it does come with detailed usage instructions that explain how to roll your tamagoyaki over the center divider, some can find this difficult, so it too, has a bit of a learning curve,

Special Honors

Aux Ameiro COS8001 Crafted from copper, the Aux Ameiro COS8001 offers excellent thermal conductivity, so it will heat up quickly and evenly. It doesn't have a tin lining, which some may appreciate, and comes with a beautiful, handmade leather handle cover. japanesetaste.com

4. Asahi CNE117

5. TeChef CeraTerra Ceramic

6. GreenPan CW001360-015

7. Nordic Ware 16230

8. Lodge L5WS3 Wonder Skillet

9. Kotobuki 410-541

10. IBBM Mini Frying


Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on July 09, 2020 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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