Updated August 21, 2020 by Christopher Thomas

The 10 Best Tie Dye Kits

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This wiki has been updated 4 times since it was first published in July of 2020. Tie-dyeing has always been a fun way to decorate fabrics, and kits like these make it simple with pre-measured amounts of dye in easy-to-use applicators, string or bands for tying, and sometimes even the garments too. Many of these kits contain powdered dyes and soda ash, which can be harmful if breathed in and an irritant to skin, so we always recommend adult supervision if kids are using them. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. If you'd like to contribute your own research to the Wiki, please get started by reviewing this introductory video.

1. Jacquard JAC9325

2. Tulip DC31679

3. SEI Tumble Dye Classic

Editor's Notes

August 06, 2020:

Like heat-pressing your own t-shirts or scribbling straight onto jeans, resist-dyeing is another popular way to get really creative with fabric, producing your own designs onto almost any kind of garment you like. What began as the ancient art of shibori in Japan, which used only naturally sourced indigo pigment, exploded with color when it was adopted by the hippie counterculture of the '60s and is now enjoying a modern revival since stars like J-Lo and Reese Witherspoon were seen sporting it.

For children who can't wait to get started but don't know the first thing about this technique, we added the Cool Maker Tidy Dye Station, which does most of the work for them and stops their hands getting too colorful as well. The Tulip 43192, which includes accessories like a scarf, headband, and scrunchie, is also easy to use and would make a great birthday gift.

Tie-dying parties are a big craze right now, and not just for kids. There are companies online organizing these kinds of events as team-building exercises for sports teams and offices, and bachelorette parties. For this reason, we added a couple of the best party-sized bundles from trusted manufacturers such as the Tulip One-Step 34723 and the Jacquard Class Pack.

Kits like the Tulip DC31679 eliminate the need for soaking beforehand and come with pre-measured amounts of pigment so you only need to add water. Other sets, like the SEI Tumble Dye Classic, have pre-mixed solutions in spray-top applicators for easy use. While these options are a good choice for youngsters and parties (where you don't want lengthy instructions), the colors can fade over time without a proper fixing stage and the dyes are usually only good on natural fibers that absorb water easily like cotton.

Items like the Jacquard JAC9325 and the Phoenix Vital Life Rit require a fixative wash before you get started which not only helps hold in the color over multiple washes but also allows you to dye many more types of fibers such as rayon and ramie, and even synthetic materials such as nylon.

For the purists intent on following the shibori techniques to a T, we added the Rit 85847. This set uses the traditional indigo pigment, demands that the color is applied by dipping and not squirted or sprayed on, and includes squares for a shaped-resist variation that the Japanese call Itajime.

Special Honors

Natural Dye Resources and Lessons If you're interested in the various ways you can dye material using only organic pigments, then have a browse of Graham Keegan's website. He sells his own indigo dye kits, has a wealth of information on the art and origins of shibori and other techniques, has online tutorials, and if you're near the Los Angeles area, you can book yourself onto one of his workshops. grahamkeegan.com

Custom Tie-Dye T-Shirt This website allows you to create your own tie-dye t-shirt and include logos, images, or text as well. It's very user-friendly and only involves a few clicks and uploads to get the design you want. Be aware you may have to order a minimum of six though. customink.com

4. Jacquard Class Pack

5. Rit 85847

6. Phoenix Vital Life Rit

7. Tulip One-Step 34723

8. SEI 6-1396

9. Tulip 43192

10. Cool Maker Tidy Dye Station


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on August 21, 2020 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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