Updated February 25, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

The 10 Best Wood Splitters

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

We spent 24 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. Chopping wood can be a very satisfying, but difficult, task, which the right tools can make considerably easier. We took a look at some of the most efficient implements for breaking wood down into usable pieces, including some that require virtually no physical effort. No matter which you choose, be certain to take all the appropriate safety precautions, as chopping timber can be hazardous. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best wood splitter on Amazon.

10. Estwing Sure-Split

9. Kindling Cracker King

8. Logosol Smart

7. Halder Simplex

6. Boss Industrial ES7T20

5. Frictionless World 100950

4. Helko Werk

3. Wen 56207

2. Fiskars X27

1. SunJoe Logger

Editor's Notes

February 24, 2019:

They say that cord wood warms you up 5 times: during felling, chopping, hauling, splitting, and finally, burning. There are quite a few refined tools that will make the second-to-last step much easier, like the Fiskars, Estwing, Helko, and Halder. The latter two of those not only work great, they will look great when stored in your garage, or while you're hard at work. On the other hand, if you've purchased your firewood pre-cut and would rather not break your back splitting it, mechanical options like the SunJoe, Logosol, and Boss will get most of the labor done for you. The Frictionless World is a lot more expensive, but it is geared toward contractors who have a lot of volume to get through. For more intricate work, check out the Kindling Cracker, which is specifically designed to help get pieces down to fire-starting sizes, without the typical dangers of using a hatchet by itself. Just be absolutely certain, no matter which too you end up with, to work carefully. Even the safest of these options can be risky, if you're not paying attention, don't follow directions, or allow someone to use it who isn't aware or able enough to control it.


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on February 25, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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