10 WW2 Books That Show Every Angle, In Fact And Fiction

Much of our world is still defined by the conflicts and advancements that were made during World War 2. The global conflict that crystallized decades of tensions, both ideological and material, is in some ways a linchpin for understanding where we are and how we got here. Which is why it's a great idea to tackle it from multiple angles. Nonfiction options cover important details and facts, while historical fiction is great for wrapping those up in a compelling narrative with characters who might illustrate broader concepts without necessarily having existed at the time. Our list compiles some of the best of both worlds, giving you a broad perspective on a seminal moment. When you click links from this website, we may receive advertising revenue to support our research. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Personal Stories Of World War 2 In Fact And Fiction

  1. Bridge of Scarlet Leaves by Kristina McMorris
  2. Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family's Heroic Resistance in Nazi-Occupied Paris by Alex Kershaw
  3. We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter
  4. The House at Tyneford by Natasha Solomons
  5. Rogue Heroes: The History of the SAS, Britain's Secret Special Forces Unit That Sabotaged the Nazis and Changed the Nature of War by Ben Macintyre
  6. Prisoner of Night and Fog by Anne Blankman
  7. Garden of Stones by Sophie Littlefield
  8. Once We Were Brothers by Ronald H. Balson
  9. The Race for Paris by Meg Waite Clayton
  10. An Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Volume One of the Liberation Trilogy by Rick Atkinson

What Technological Advancements Were Made During World War 2?

In Depth

World War 2 continues to be a significant part of history, with its long-lasting effects on many countries and countless people's lives. Historical fiction and nonfiction books have long appealed to readers. The best include page-turning stories on espionage and intrigue, heartbreaking experiences in internment camps, and courage and redemption, among other things. In no particular order, this list offers ten works that highlight issues surrounding the Second World War, including key moments and milestones.

#1. "Bridge of Scarlet Leaves" by Kristina McMorris. Musician Maddie Kern embarks on a touching journey as she falls in love with the ambitious Lane Moritomo, the son of Japanese immigrants. After Pearl Harbor is bombed, their decision to get married brings on struggles for Maddie's family. As she strives for her husband to be accepted by her loved ones, Lane takes a lot of risks to prove his loyalty to America.

With plenty of historical details and well-developed characters, this gripping tale about a timeless love story will appeal to fans of both romance novels and American history.

With plenty of historical details and well-developed characters, this gripping tale about a timeless love story will appeal to fans of both romance novels and American history.

#2. "Avenue of Spies" by Alex Kershaw. The remarkable true story of an American doctor in Paris and his courageous acts of espionage during World War 2 is written in a classic non-fiction style, but with elements similar to thriller books. Centered on Sumner Jackson and his family's work for the French Resistance despite being surrounded by spy hunters and Nazi neighbors, this suspenseful narrative captures an exhilarating pursuit during some of history's darkest times.

The author's engaging storytelling and heart-stopping details will have readers gripped from beginning to end.

#3. "We Were the Lucky Ones" by Georgia Hunter. Inspired by true events, this extraordinary piece provides an intimate depiction of a Jewish family who were separated at the beginning of World War 2. Hunter puts forward a beautifully woven account of her own family, whose members were determined to live and come together in the midst of adversity. Despite the increasing threats towards Jews in Poland, the family talked of life and love. However, the menacing terrors of the war caused them to split up, leaving them to rely on their steadfast will to survive.

However, the menacing terrors of the war caused them to split up, leaving them to rely on their steadfast will to survive.

#4. "The House at Tyneford" by Natasha Solomons. This New York Times bestselling novel tells a brilliant love story with a compelling narrative and charming characters. In the late 1930s, when Jews faced great dangers due to the looming war, Elise Landau finds herself leaving her luxurious life filled with parties to work as a parlor maid in England. After arriving at Tyneford and learning about serving drinks and polishing silver, she meets the son of the great house's master.

Kit and Elise develop an unlikely bond that will change their lives forever. Fans of ITV's historical drama "Downton Abbey" will delight in the book's notable storytelling and details, taking them back in time to old English mansions, upper classes, and domestic servants.

#5. "Rogue Heroes" by Ben Macintyre. A suspenseful nonfiction narrative about the founding of the British Special Air Services, this book vividly brings all of its characters to life. Highlighting these heroes' endurance, bravery, and triumph, the author also puts in specific historical details about the S.A.S. to come up with a riveting account of their early days. The organization was important because they employed tactics that would go on to be applied by the military in the next decades.

Highlighting these heroes' endurance, bravery, and triumph, the author also puts in specific historical details about the S.A.S. to come up with a riveting account of their early days.

Gripping scenes, such as unexpected parachute drops, night-time raids, and marches across deserts will transport readers to the frightening world of what actual war is like.

#6. "Prisoner of Night and Fog" by Anne Blankman. This coming-of-age tale smoothly combines a thrilling murder mystery with fascinating and shocking details about Hitler's rise to power. Gretchen Muller follows every task given to her by her Uncle Adolf, believing his intentions to cherish and protect their people. However, after Gretchen meets a Jewish reporter, she learns about harrowing secrets and unsettling violence outside of her world.

Her struggle to learn the truth makes for an engrossing historical fiction, offering readers a unique perspective on a well-discussed period.

Her struggle to learn the truth makes for an engrossing historical fiction, offering readers a unique perspective on a well-discussed period.

#7. "Garden of Stones" by Sophie Littlefield. This powerful war story about strength and survival places the spotlight on a mother-daughter pair. Taken from their home, Miyako and her teenage daughter, Lucy, are brought to the Manzanar prison camp along with other innocent Japanese-Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

As the two come up against ruthless people and tough living conditions in the camp, Miyako takes an act of desperation that her child won't ever forget. This moving tale of sacrifice and actions committed in the name of motherhood holds an unforgettable revelation.

#8. "Once We Were Brothers" by Ronald H. Balson. Set in war-torn Poland, this novel uses the perspective of fictional character Ben Solomon to tell the captivating story of two boys and their family who struggled to survive. A German boy named Otto was left by his mother to the Solomon family, becoming part of a Jewish home and loving them like his own blood. Years later, he makes a dreadful decision, opposing the Solomons and everything they have stood for.

Set in war-torn Poland, this novel uses the perspective of fictional character Ben Solomon to tell the captivating story of two boys and their family who struggled to survive.

After several decades, Ben must face Otto once more. He accuses Otto of terrible war crimes since joining the Nazis. This phenomenal piece will appeal to all readers, including fans of legal thriller novels, with its uplifting messages and astute understanding of people's intentions.

#9. "The Race for Paris" by Meg Waite Clayton. The author introduces readers to a world where brave women thrive, detailing the risks they take and the motivations that drive them. Two American journalists and a British military photographer take an unforgettable journey to Paris and capture the city's liberation from the Nazis. Based on real-life female reporters, such as Lee Miller and Margaret Bourke-White, this engrossing narrative combines expert storytelling and in-depth research to create a phenomenal tale on women and war.

#10. "An Army at Dawn" by Rick Atkinson. This Pulitzer Prize-winning piece is the first volume of the "Liberation Trilogy," adeptly telling the story of how North Africa came into the scene in World War 2. It provides readers with a better grasp on how the Allied powers achieved their triumph. Battle by battle, country after country, this splendid book underlines how an army led by ineffective leaders gradually transforms into an unstoppable fighting force.