Updated September 24, 2018 by Lydia Chipman

The 10 Best Juicers

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

We spent 36 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. Juicing has come a long way since the days of using a strainer bowl and elbow grease to make lemonade. From high-speed centrifugal models that whip ingredients into custom blends and smoothies, to the heavy-duty masticators recommended for cleanses, there's something in our selection for anyone who's looking to enjoy garden-fresh goodness in liquid form. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best juicer on Amazon.

10. Kuvings C7000

9. Champion G5-PG710

8. Hurom HH Elite

7. Super Angel Deluxe

6. Breville Juice Fountain Cold XL

5. Omega Nutrition Center

4. Aicok Whole Slow

3. Breville Juice Fountain Duo

2. Omega Vert

1. Tribest Greenstar Pro

The Juice Is Loose

Fresh juices, whether derived from fruits or vegetables, have more bioavailability than the fruits or veggies do on their own.

Fresh juices, whether derived from fruits or vegetables, have more bioavailability than the fruits or veggies do on their own. It's a pretty simple formula when you think about it. You take a bite of kale, chew it less than the recommended number of chews per bite of food, and swallow. Your body then goes to work at pushing the kale through your system, breaking it down first with saliva and its attendant enzyme activity on the way to the stomach. There, stomach acids break the kale down even further, passing what's left of the process into your intestines, which drink up all the available nutrients from the process.

From the moment the food enters your mouth, your body has the ability to absorb its nutrients. Usually, however, the mouth and the stomach are so busy breaking foods down to a digestible point that they don't have time to absorb any of those micro-nutrients that might otherwise pass the membranes in your mouth and esophagus and get right into your bloodstream.

Take a look at a smart hippie in the late 1960s, by way of example. When he takes a tab of acid, he doesn't just swallow it. If he waits for his stomach to break down the tab and let the LSD into his system, it could be the better part of an hour before he feels anything. Instead, he rolls the tab around in his mouth, letting the chemical pass through the membranes in his mouth and absorb into the capillary activity there, creating a much faster effect.

The same goes for your food. When you drop a carrot into a juicer, that juicer, by means of either extraction or mastication, separates its juices and all of those great nutrients from its fibrous material. When you drink that juice, the moment it hits your mouth you begin to absorb those nutrients, and you continue to do so all the way through the stomach, creating an experience of greater bioavailability, or, literally, the ability your body has to access all the good stuff.

To Chew Or To Shred

You've probably heard that juicing is bad because it oxidizes or overheats the material and that it removes all that wonderful fiber. Well, these are partial truths, that examination of which should help you decide which of the juicers on our list is right for you.

Extraction juicers spin a thin, sharp webbing of blades beneath a tube through which you feed and push foods.

As for the claim about heat and oxidization, it's true that juicing oxidizes food. Anything in an oxygen-rich environment (like the Earth's atmosphere, for example), will oxidize. Moisture increases this exchange, which is why fruits and veggies shrivel up more quickly after you cut them; their insides tend to be wetter than their outsides. Juice is about as moist as it can get, so your mixture will likely lose a good portion of its enzyme activity to oxidization within the first 20 minutes after juicing. The good news there is that you can keep the majority of your enzymes just by drinking your juice as soon as you make it.

The heat claim is more pertinent among the extraction juicers on our list than the masticating juicers. Extraction juicers spin a thin, sharp webbing of blades beneath a tube through which you feed and push foods. Those blades shred the fiber and send it flying into a reservoir, while the liquid left over from the process heads into your glass. The friction that those fast-moving blades create against your food does create some heat, but not enough to meaningfully harm your juice.

Masticating juicers work in a similar fashion, but they have a rotating set of teeth that move very slowly in a confined area, simulating the process of very powerful jaws chewing your food for you. They tend to get more juice out of the material you feed through them, as the fiber that lands in their reservoirs is noticeably drier than that of the extraction juicers.

As for the fiber, I'll borrow a line usually reserved for gun control debates. Juicers don't get rid of fiber; people who use juicers get rid of fiber. It's all right there for you to use in a million different ways. There are books and websites devoted to what you can do with that fibrous material, so don't buy into the myth that it magically goes to waste.

One other important thing to mention is that none of these juicers are easy to clean. If one says they're easy to clean, that only means they're easy to clean compared to other juicers. Juicing is inherently a messy process, but every moment spent cleaning and reassembling your juicer is a moment spent in undeniably greater health.

Old Medicine, New Means

Even without advanced mechanical intervention, humans have long combined mashed versions of fruits and vegetables for their healing abilities, applied both internally and externally. As far back as the first century CE, in the Dead Sea Scrolls, we can find evidence of a pounded mash of pomegranate and fig that sounds pretty tasty.

Throughout the next several decades, new players entered the market, jockeying for superiority in their juice quality and, most importantly, in their ease of cleanup.

Mechanical intervention finally arrived in the early 20th century. In 1936, Dr. Norman Walker published a book called Raw Vegetable Juices, which led to the development of the Norwalk juicer, which is still one of the revered brands in the industry.

Throughout the next several decades, new players entered the market, jockeying for superiority in their juice quality and, most importantly, in their ease of cleanup. In the past few decades, partially fueled by the rapid decline of the Western diet, as well as the success of chains like Jamba Juice and Smoothie King, the average person's appetite for juice has reached new heights, and there are more options available now than ever before.

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Lydia Chipman
Last updated on September 24, 2018 by Lydia Chipman

An itinerant wordsmith with a broad constellation of interests, Lydia Chipman has turned iconoclasm into a livelihood of sorts. Bearing the scars and stripes of an uncommon diversity of experience -- with the notable exceptions of joining a religious order or becoming an artist -- she still can’t resist the temptation to learn something new. Lydia holds a master of arts in English from Georgia Southern University, and a bachelor of arts cum laude in integrative studies from Clayton College. Her expertise is in the areas of robotics, electronics, toys, and outdoors and computer equipment.


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