6 Helpful Resources For Anyone Interested In Nature

Whether you've spent years studying ecology or are simply fascinated by the natural world, there's always something new to learn. The resources listed here provide lovers of nature with opportunities to learn interesting things about the environment, share their own findings with others, and go on adventures to see plants and animals in person. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Informative Resources For Nature Lovers

Name Mission
Grassroots Ecology Engage and educate the public to restore local ecosystems
The Metropolitan Field Guide Help people rediscover their connection to the natural world
iNaturalist Canada Give citizen scientists a platform to record observations from nature, learn about biodiversity, and connect with other naturalists
Montana Natural History Center Promote and cultivate the appreciation, understanding, and stewardship of nature through education
Natural Habitat Adventures Protect the planet by inspiring travelers, supporting local communities, and influencing the entire travel industry
Ontario Nature Protect wild species and spaces through conservation, education, and public engagement

Wildlife Conservation Facts

The Awesome Power Of Citizen Science

5 Tips For Responsibly Viewing Wildlife

According to the U.S. National Park Service

  1. Learn about wildlife, viewing sites, and local regulations before you go
  2. Use binoculars and zoom lenses to get a good look without getting too close
  3. Never touch, handle, or frighten wildlife
  4. Store your food securely and properly dispose of trash
  5. Always use common sense and stay safe

Benefits Of Spending Time Outdoors

  • Sunlight is a natural source of vitamin D
  • In the winter, leaving the house can lessen the effects of Seasonal Affective Disorder
  • Hiking is a great way to stay physically active
  • Walking in the fresh air can help with mental health
  • It's a great opportunity to learn about local plant and animal species
  • Going outside may be good for children's vision

Getting Hooked On Nature

In Depth

If you're a budding naturalist, online resources can help you learn more and find a community. From volunteer and travel opportunities to enlightening blogs, there are plenty of organizations worth looking into. Here, in no particular order, are useful resources that every nature lover will want to check out.

Up first, in the #1 spot, we have Grassroots Ecology. Located in Palo Alto, this nonprofit works to restore the local ecosystems of Silicon Valley. Volunteers can participate in habitat restoration projects across the region, as well as community-based scientific studies and urban ecology initiatives.

Grassroots Ecology provides educational opportunities for students of all ages, including self-guided lesson plans that children can do at home. This organization hosts monthly guided walks where experienced naturalists discuss local plants, animals, and natural history. It also offers a California Naturalist Certificate training program.

It also offers a California Naturalist Certificate training program.

#2 on our list is Kelly Brenner, a Seattle-based naturalist, writer, and photographer. In 2009, this Pacific Northwest native founded her blog, The Metropolitan Field Guide, to record observations of the region's local flora and fauna. Amateur naturalists and urban gardeners alike can find helpful guides on her blog.

Brenner has contributed to publications such as Popular Science and National Wildlife Magazine. Her first book, Nature Obscura: A City's Hidden Natural World, was published in 2020. In addition to discussing wildlife plants and urban species, Brenner writes a regular series on folklore and nature. She is also the founder of the Nudibranch Appreciation Society.

Coming in at #3, we have iNaturalist Canada, an online community and mobile app that allows naturalists of all expertise levels to record their observations with wildlife. This data helps scientists and resource managers understand when and where organisms occur. Community members can also meet other nature watchers and learn about Canada's wildlife.

Community members can also meet other nature watchers and learn about Canada's wildlife.

By participating as citizen scientists, iNaturalist Canada users can contribute to a growing wealth of knowledge of Canadian species and help conserve the natural world. Users can connect with experts who can identify organisms or join in-person events where people try to find as many species as possible.

Up next, in the #4 spot is the Montana Natural History Center. Founded in 1991, MNHC was the brainchild of a group of educators working to educate people of all ages about the natural history of western Montana. The center is home to a variety of kid-friendly exhibits, and it is available for school field trips.

The Montana Natural History Center provides free online educational resources. The center connects professional naturalists with elementary classrooms. Each summer, it hosts an outdoor discovery day camp. There are also educational opportunities for adults, such as the center's Master Naturalist certification courses, and various evening lectures.

Each summer, it hosts an outdoor discovery day camp.

At #5, we have Natural Habitat Adventures. Since 1985, Nat Hab has provided nature and wildlife experiences to small groups of passionate explorers. These trips are led by trained naturalist guides, and itineraries are developed in collaboration with World Wildlife fund. Destinations include remote locations such as the Galapagos Islands and Antarctica.

There are also excursions specifically designed for photographers and families. In 2019, this carbon-neutral travel company operated an event called The World's First Zero-Waste Adventure. These intimate expeditions provide opportunities for close-up, meaningful interactions with wildlife. The company also hosts daily webinars that include conservation updates, nature photography tutorials, and more.

And finally, #6 on our list is Ontario Nature, a conservation organization that protects wild species and spaces through conservation, education, and public engagement. Since it was first established as the Federation of Ontario Naturalists in 1931, this group has been a champion for nature in the region.

Since it was first established as the Federation of Ontario Naturalists in 1931, this group has been a champion for nature in the region.

The group's Citizen Science Program relies on nature lovers to help increase collective knowledge of wildlife in Ontario. High-school aged students can participate in the Nature Guardians Youth Program. In 2015, this group established the Ontario Master Naturalist Certificate training in partnership with Lakehead University.