6 Unique Destinations That Make Pennsylvania Special

Besides being home to so much American history and so many notable figures, Pennsylvania is a great place for families to experience art, nature, museums, and festivals all across the state. Each of these destinations offers something you won't find anywhere else, so there's sure to be something you and your kids will want to see on your next trip. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

6 Can't-Miss Attractions In Pennsylvania

Destination Location Description
National Apple Harvest Festival Biglerville Outdoor festival dedicated to apples with music, arts & crafts, a petting zoo, and events for the whole family
Valley Forge and Montgomery County King of Prussia and surrounding area Historical sites, recreational areas, a zoo, and an aquarium are just a few of the things to see here
Kentuck Knob Chalk Hill Home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright coupled with outdoor sculpture collection
Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Pittsburgh Nation's largest vintage street race, along with 10 days of free events dedicated to classic automobiles, benefiting the Autism Society of Pittsburgh and Merakey Allegheny Valley School
Historic Bethlehem Museums & Sites Bethlehem Collection of museums and historical sites in Bethlehem, offering tours and seasonal festivals
Wayne Art Center Wayne Provides studio and gallery space for kids and adults to explore art, music, cooking, and gardens through classes, exhibitions, competitions, and community events

The 2017 Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix

Fun Facts About Pennsylvania

Valley Forge Brings History To Life

In Depth

Cities all over America have shopping, nightlife, and restaurants, but the thing that makes Pennsylvania truly special is the wealth of history and culture available all throughout the state. Whether you're a history buff, a nature lover, or an art hound, there's something for you tucked away in the Keystone State. In no particular order, here are six places you won't want to miss on your next family vacation.

Kicking off the list at #1 is the National Apple Harvest Festival, held during the first two full weekends of October in Biglerville, a small town about seven miles from Gettysburg in the center of the state. This outdoor event at the South Mountain Fairgrounds has been going for more than 50 years, and features great food, a petting zoo, live performances for the whole family, and of course plenty of apples.

Arts and crafts are a big part of the festival, with some 300 individuals stalls offering a variety of goods to the 25,000 daily attendees. Those interested can sign up to display their work at a booth, or supply their antique automobiles for display. And if you're a sophomore or junior in high school, you can run for Apple Queen, and take a truly memorable part in promoting this industry.

Arts and crafts are a big part of the festival, with some 300 individuals stalls offering a variety of goods to the 25,000 daily attendees.

At #2 is Valley Forge and Montgomery County. You may be familiar with Valley Forge because of its history as an encampment location for the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. The park itself is a fascinating place for kids and adults to learn about history by seeing the places where people like George Washington actually lived, and features guided tours that hit the major sites while offering a lot of information so you can get the most out of your visit.

Beyond the historical legacy of the area, Montgomery County has a lot to offer, from recreational activities that let you get back to nature, to a zoo and aquarium that kids will love. The Valley Forge Tourism and Convention Board offers a wealth of information on its website for those interested in visiting, including a list of haunted sites and a guide to finding Pokemon during your trip.

#3 on the list is Kentuck Knob, the site of a home designed by renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Located just seven miles from Fallingwater, the only other of Wright's famous creations in Pennsylvania, the Kentuck Knob house is a one-story building situated just below the crest of a hill, and is a gorgeous example of Usonian style, the architect's vision of affordable homes that were uniquely American.

Located just seven miles from Fallingwater, the only other of Wright's famous creations in Pennsylvania, the Kentuck Knob house is a one-story building situated just below the crest of a hill, and is a gorgeous example of Usonian style, the architect's vision of affordable homes that were uniquely American.

Guided house tours are offered to take guests through the home, which is privately owned. Visitors can also experience the Woodland Walk, featuring breathtaking views of nature as well as a collection of post-World War II sculptures, turning this elegantly-designed residence into a forum for appreciating great works of art. Enthusiasts will love the chance to get a glimpse inside this notable house and peruse the gift shop for Wright-related souvenirs.

At #4 is the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix, the nation's largest vintage street race. Presented by the Greater Pittsburgh Automotive Dealers Foundation, it features ten days of racing and events related to classic automobiles. Now in its 37th year, it raises funds for autistic and intellectually or developmentally disabled individuals in the Pittsburgh area, and has donated more than $5 million since its founding.

Each July, Schenley Park is filled with more than 2,500 cars from all over the world. With 20 separate displays featuring makes from throughout history, it's only $40 to enter your car, and free to the public to visit. The following weekend, the race attracts almost 200,000 spectators. There are also many other events and parades, so car junkies won't run out of things to see. Donations are encouraged to help the event keep going and fund the Autism Society of Pittsburgh and Merakey Allegheny Valley School in their important work.

The following weekend, the race attracts almost 200,000 spectators.

The #5 pick is Historic Bethlehem Museums and Sites, a collection of attractions that put Bethlehem's unique past on display. These include the Moravian Museum, located in the town's oldest building that at one time housed the entire community, the 1750 Smithy, a blacksmithing shop, and the Burnside Plantation, a 6.5-acre grounds listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Many different tours are offered by the Historic Bethlehem Partnership that put the rich heritage of the area on display. There are special Christmas events, a yearly blueberry festival, and many other things to see and do in different seasons. Volunteers are always appreciated, as it takes an entire community to produce so many fun and educational events and attractions.

Rounding out the list at #6 is the Wayne Art Center. Founded in 1930, the facilities feature nine art studios, five music studios, and five gallery spaces, providing opportunities for both kids and adults to develop their appreciation of art through classes and exhibitions. Visitors can view more than 6,000 square feet of artwork in a variety of mediums, and studios are available for painting, ceramics, and jewelry, as well as two dedicated children's studios.

Founded in 1930, the facilities feature nine art studios, five music studios, and five gallery spaces, providing opportunities for both kids and adults to develop their appreciation of art through classes and exhibitions.

In addition to the collections, the center also has seven garden areas where guests can take a break and experience the beauty of nature. In 2007, a state-of-the-art kitchen was added, allowing visiting chefs a place to perform demonstrations and lead classes. Members are able to participate by submitting their work for exhibitions, giving students a chance to put their creations on display at the same site as some of their favorite artists.