9 Great Books About Books That Readers are Sure to Love

If bookshelves take up most of your walls and you're constantly reaching for your reading glasses, you've come to the right place. These nine wonderful books about books are any reader's dream come true. Whether you're looking for a non-fiction work that analyzes literature or a novel that puts books front & center in its plot, something on this list is sure to delight you. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

video play icon

9 Great Books About Books That Readers are Sure to Love

Title Author(s)
1. S. J.J. Abrams & Doug Dorst
2. On Reading Well Karen Swallow Prior
3. Sparkles in Love Sarah Gai
4. The Weeping Books of Blinney Lane Drea Damara
5. Jerzy Jerome Charyn
6. The Bookshop of Yesterdays Amy Meyerson
7. Everybody Behaves Badly Lesley M.M. Blume
8. I’d Rather Be Reading Guinevere de la Mare
9. How To Be a Heroine Samantha Ellis

Literary Charities

If you want to spread your love of literature with those in need, then you should consider looking into these non-profit organizations that help kids and teens get access to books and high-quality education.

  1. First Book
  2. Books for Kids
  3. Room to Read
  4. LitWorld
  5. 826 National
  6. KIPP

How Books Can Open Your Mind

In Depth

In the real world, books have a tremendous amount of power to shape minds and pull readers into magical, incredible fictional universes. On the page, however, books can hold even more power. From stories of enchanted books full of secrets to tales about the healing power of fiction, there are tons of tales from almost every genre imaginable about the wonder of getting lost in the written word. Here, in no particular order, are a few of the most absorbing works about reading and literature that will keep you turning the pages.

Coming in at #1, we have "S." by J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst. When Jennifer finds an old book by a forgotten master, she's full of questions. It's not just the book that's intriguing: the copy she found is full of personal notes and marginalia written by the previous owner. When Jennifer starts writing her own notes in response, she and the stranger enter into a correspondence that will change both of their lives forever.

At #2 is Karen Swallow Prior's "On Reading Well." Can reading the classics help you be a moral person? Prior certainly believes this to be the case. While great works of literature have always been praised for their sharp, unflinching portrayals of life, they haven't always been written about in terms of their ability to shape the way we think about the cornerstone virtues of humility, patience, and trust. Packed with insight and new perspectives, this refreshing work will have you thinking more deeply about every book you encounter.

Packed with insight and new perspectives, this refreshing work will have you thinking more deeply about every book you encounter.

At #3 is Sarah Gai's "Sparkles in Love." Jess is still waiting for an epic romance to come along and sweep her off her feet. Could the man of her dreams be Brax, her hot neighbor? It's possible. With Jess crushing hard on the brooding hunk next door, she counts on her friends May and Haley, co-founders of the Sparkle Book Club, to keep her sane as she searches for her true soulmate.

For #4, we find "The Weeping Books of Blinney Lane" by Drea Damara. In Salem, one bookstore is different from the others. It's been cursed by a powerful witch who turned all its books into magical weeping objects. Sarah, the present owner of the bookstore, is used to this by now. But when her nephew comes to town, she has to make sure he doesn't find out about the books' power to potentially destroy their lives forever.

The far-off land of Farwin Wood might seem like a fun place to visit, but Sarah knows better than to awaken the weeping books and re-enter that dangerous, enchanted world from which too few return.

The far-off land of Farwin Wood might seem like a fun place to visit, but Sarah knows better than to awaken the weeping books and re-enter that dangerous, enchanted world from which too few return.

Coming in at #5 is "Jerzy" by Jerome Charyn. Jerzy Kosinski was one of the most fascinating figures of the postmodern age. His book "Being There" was adapted as a Peter Sellers vehicle, and his book "The Painted Bird" earned him literary acclaim in the years following its 1965 release. But who was Jerzy, and what was his story? In this reimagining of the literary figure, Charyn breathes life into the writer, holocaust survivor, and cipher that was Kosinski himself.

In the #6 slot is Amy Meyerson's "The Bookshop of Yesterdays." As a kid, Miranda loved nothing more than spending time in her Uncle Billy's bookstore. When Billy cuts himself off from the family, Miranda mourns the loss of her favorite relative. Sixteen years later, she gets the news that Billy has died and left her Prospero Books, the place where she'd spent her happiest childhood years.

But when Miranda moves back to L.A. to take ownership of the store, she starts learning more about her mysterious uncle, and the secrets he kept in his lifetime, than she could have prepared herself for.

But when Miranda moves back to L.A. to take ownership of the store, she starts learning more about her mysterious uncle, and the secrets he kept in his lifetime, than she could have prepared herself for.

At #7 is "Everybody Behaves Badly" by Lesley M.M. Blume. Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" is a classic of Lost Generation literature. The story behind it, however, is even more fascinating than the fiction. In this detailed book, readers can learn about the characters and events that inspired Hemingway to write his masterpiece, from his strained friendship with F. Scott Fitzgerald to his round-table discussions with literary luminaries like Gertrude Stein and John Dos Passos.

For #8, we get Guinevere de la Mare's "I'd Rather Be Reading." We're taught not to judge a book by its cover. But what about when the covers themselves are stunning works of art? In this visual compendium of book-related art, writers and readers across genres come together to talk about the thing that's most important in their lives: the powerful, incredible written word.

Finally, at #9, is "How To Be a Heroine" by Samantha Ellis. Playwright Ellis has always modeled herself after her favorite literary characters, from Jane Eyre to the women of Jane Austen. In this highly original volume, Ellis brings her love and knowledge of literary heroines to the forefront, showing how great female characters have the power to shape, change, and transform our lives forever.